The Charities of Springfield, Illinois: A Survey Under the Direction of the American Association of Societies for Organizing Charity

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Springfield Survey Committee, 1915 - Charities - 185 pages
 

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Page 155 - Klngsbury here assumed the chair and Introduced the papers and discussions of the Committee on Families and Neighborhoods in a few appropriate remarks. The Chairman: I have pleasure in introducing Mr. Francis H. McLean, General Secretary of the American Association of Societies for Organizing Charity. Mr. McLean read a paper entitled "Working Programs in Variously Sized Cities.
Page i - ZENAS L. POTTER, Department of Surveys and Exhibits, Russell Sage Foundation. VII THE CHARITIES OF SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS. FRANCIS H. MCLEAN, General Secretary, American Association of Societies for Organizing Charity. VIII INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS IN SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS. LOUISE C. ODENCRANTZ, Committee on Women's Work, and ZENAS L. POTTER, Department of Surveys and Exhibits, Russell Sage Foundation. IX CITY AND COUNTY ADMINISTRATION IN SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS. DO DECKER, Department of Surveys and Exhibits,...
Page 135 - Johnson says : There is no more important part of almshouse administration than the employment of inmates. While their labor in many cases has little cash value, it is none the less valuable for other reasons. It may be stated as a rule to which there is no exception that every inmate except the bedridden ones should have some employment during a part of the day, and the more fully the usual hours are occupied, the better.
Page 137 - Johnson again, be provided with benches and chairs; "among which should be a good proportion of rocking and easy chairs for the older inmates. . . . Good strong tables, one or two couches, and a few shelves on the walls for books and papers, should complete the furniture of the room. "Prints and pictures are now so good and so cheap that there is no reason why the walls of the sitting rooms should not be ornamented with them. A few plants in the windows are bright and cheerful.
Page 95 - between private charitable societies and between the public and private agencies. 4. Improvements have been made in bringing legal influence to bear upon non-supporting husbands and fathers. 5. Home for the Friendless has begun to initiate placing-out and other child welfare work along lines recommended. A trained nurse has been added to its staff, and the physical condition of the children Is reported to be greatly Improved. 6. A trained nurse employed to care for the tuberculous and...
Page 101 - ... group were carefully read. The result was the formulation of certain general conclusions with reference to charitable work in Springfield, which became more and more clear-cut and certain as the study proceeded.* In the first place, the data on record in the local agencies responsible for families were very incomplete. Second, although recognizing that in many cases disabilities and other facts were probably ascertained but not recorded, it was evident that investigation of conditions in homes...
Page 47 - ... Springfield not only fail to make special provision for this class of sick persons but they withhold treatment if the condition is known at the time application is made. The Springfield Hospital has refused all mental cases and St. John's Hospital will take a person suffering from mental disease only if the physician in charge of the case will employ a special nurse and assume all responsibility. Alcoholic cases are admitted under exceptional conditions. Nevertheless there are not a few patients...
Page 58 - SIZE AND EXTENT OF THE CHARITIES PROBLEM In 1913, 1,764 Springfield families received some kind of charitable service from public or private organizations. Each spot represents a family. (A few could not be located because of faulty addresses.) aid, would be directed toward the father's recovery; it would thus help the family to the place where it could take care of itself. In carrying out this ideal several things are imperative. First, there must be accurate knowledge of the difficulties in which...
Page 54 - ... no savings or other resources, and outside aid is needed. Obviously the key to the situation lies in the father's restoration to health. As long as there is hope of restored health there is hope for restored family normality. Modern charitable effort, in addition to temporary aid, would be directed toward the father's recovery; it would thus help the family to the place where it could take care of itself. This kind of effort involves much more, of course, than the giving of food, shelter, clothes,...
Page 149 - ... situation in which, for example, there was an idle or loafing father. If in order to put a little stamina into him, either by moral suasion or by the offer of employment or legal proceedings, the return of the child to school is delayed for a short time, the child's interest may often be best conserved. Habitual truancy generally indicates a family rather than an individual disorder. It points to weaknesses lying much further back and is least often overcome by simply forcing a child into school...

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