The Chemistry of Iron & Steel Making: And of Their Practical Uses

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Chatto & Windus, 1890 - Iron - 420 pages
 

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Page 20 - ... mentioned, called the bottom coal or heathern coal, as if God had decreed the time when and how these smiths should be supplied, and this island also, with iron ; and most especially that this coal and iron-stone should give the first and last occasion for the invention of making iron with pit-coal, no place being so fit for the invention to be perfected in as this country for the general good ; whose lands did formerly abound in forests, chases, parks, and woods, but exhausted in these parts.
Page 21 - Shropshire, from iron-ore and coal, both got in the same dale, makes iron brittle or tough as he pleases, there being cannon thus cast so soft as to bear turning like wrought-iron.
Page 18 - Authour very well knoweth how to mend their Natures, by finning or setting the finery, lesse transhaw, more borrow which are terms of art, and by altering and pitching the works, and plates, the fore...
Page 10 - Cole-works being brought unto perfection, the Author was by force thrown out of them, and the Bellows of his new Furnace and Invention, by riotous persons cut in pieces, to his no small prejudice, and loss of his Invention of making of Iron with Pit-cole, Sea-cole, &c. So that being with Law-Suites, and Riots, wearied and disabled to prosecute his Art and Invention at present, «ven untill the first Pattent was extinct...
Page 14 - Engeneers assistance to get his Bellows to be blown, at, or near the Pits of Cole, with which Engines the Work could not be performed : But the Author coming to see the said Works, and after many Discourses with Captain Copley, his former Acquaintance, told him plainly, if his Bellows could have been blown by those Engines, yet I feared he could not make Iron with Pit-cole...
Page 20 - Now, if the coals and ironstone so abounding were made right use of, we need not want iron as we do, for very many measures of ironstone are placed together under the great ten yards...
Page 7 - Esq. ; for 31 years, for the making of Iron with Pit-cole and Seacole for the preservation of Wood and Timber of Great Brittain so greatly then consumed...
Page 213 - ... for steel iron for such a purpose would be improved by that amount of phosphorus. It is, however, quite obvious that such a combination of conditions is practically impossible. When we consider the work to be done by the edge of a chisel, a hatchet, a sword, a graver, or a turning tool, by the teeth of a file, or a saw, or the duty of edged tools generally, it is obvious that the power of resisting a sudden, a vibratory, and a transverse shock is the property most demanded.
Page 10 - Authour went on with his invention cheerfully, and made annually great store of Iron, good and merchantable, and sold it unto diverse men yet living at Twelve pounds per Tun...
Page 13 - Buck and the other partners, importuned the author, who was at that time in great danger by the Parliament (being a Colonel of the King's party), to go along with them into the Forest of Dean...

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