The Childhood of Ji-shib, the Ojibwa: And Sixty-four Pen Sketches

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American thresherman, 1900 - Courage - 130 pages
As Ji-Shib grows up, he learns the ways of his people living together, learning medicine, preparing for war and living through an attack by another tribe, until, after his fasting, he receives a vision and becomes a man. The story is told from the viewpoint of the little boy and from the viewpoint of his guardian spirit, the beaver.
 

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Page 104 - Hear my voice, ye heroes! On that day when our warriors sprang with shouts on the dastardly
Page 29 - O my little Blue Bird, O my little Blue Bird, Mother knew that you would come, Mother knew that you would come. When the ice lets go the river, When the wild-geese come again, When the sugar-maple swells, When the maple swells its buds, Then the little blue birds come, Then my little Blue Bird came.
Page 130 - and the beaver, on, on to the village. And thus they were always together, for the beaver watched over Ji-shib and kept him, and Ji-shib knew that the Spirit of the beaver was at all times stronger, and better, and wiser than he.
Page 104 - the plains like a fox. They shall shake like a leaf in the storm.
Page 30 - O my little Blue Bird, O my little Blue Bird, Mother knew that you would come, Mother knew that you would come. When the ice lets go the river, When the wild-geese come again, When the sugar-maple swells,
Page 130 - bag in his hand, left the old tree in the forest, and started slowly homeward. Under the pine trees, past the great shady maples, stopping to pick the bright red winter-green berries, lingering a moment at the wild rice fields to hear the liquid song of the bobolink, together they went,
Page 81 - At such times the Indians desired to leave in the village food, and skins for clothing, to supply the Squaws and children and old men who remained behind ; there must also be a large supply of moccasins and bows and arrows and tomahawks for the warriors themselves.
Page 85 - and another one far up the trunk, and then they cut a straight line down the side of the tree from one circular cut to the other. Just like a boy in the country who is almost undressed by the time he gets to the
Page 84 - and squashes. After planting their gardens they frequently tanned skins all day long, and sewed moccasins in the evening by the light of the wigwam fire. The young Indians hunted and fished a great deal. Many of the old Indians and Squaws were absent from the village making arrow heads, while the other Indians built new canoes, and made bows and arrows.
Page 86 - the seams so that they would not leak, poking the pitch in with a flaming stick. The canoe was then completed. They carried it to the lake, and it floated like a bubble.

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