The Church in Relation to the State

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C. Kegan Paul, 1880 - Church and state - 272 pages
 

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Page 12 - The only way whereby any one divests himself of his natural liberty, and puts on the bonds of civil society, is by agreeing with other men to join and unite into a community for their comfortable, safe, and peaceable living one amongst another, in a secure enjoyment of their properties, and a greater security against any, that are not of it.
Page 16 - By me kings reign, and princes decree justice. By me princes rule, and nobles, even all the judges of the earth.
Page 11 - This is more than consent, or concord; it is a real unity of them all, in one and the same person, made by covenant of every man with every man, in such manner as if every man should say to every man...
Page 80 - Lord ordained that they who preach the Gospel, should live of the Gospel.
Page 139 - Highness that it may be established and enacted by the authority aforesaid that such jurisdictions, privileges, superiorities and preeminences spiritual and ecclesiastical, as by any spiritual or ecclesiastical power or authority hath heretofore been or may lawfully be exercised or used for the visitation of the ecclesiastical state and persons, and for reformation, order and correction of the same and of all manner of errors, heresies, schisms, abuses, offences, contempts and enormities, shall for...
Page 149 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the Laws of God, the true Profession of the Gospel, and the Protestant Reformed Religion established by law? And will you maintain and preserve inviolably the Settlement of the Church of England, and the Doctrine, Worship, Discipline, and Government thereof, as by law established in England?
Page 140 - He would wnuam's not suffer that any one in all his dominions should receive the dealing pontiff of the city of Rome as apostolic pope, except at his command, or should on any condition receive his letters if they had not been first shown to himself.
Page 141 - This court was. erected and united to the regal power by virtue of the statute i Eliz. i'., instead of a larger jurisdiction which had before been exercised under the Pope's authority. It was intended to vindicate the dignity and peace of the Church, by reforming, ordering, and correcting the ecclesiastical state and persons, and all manner of errors, heresies, schisms, abuses, offences, contempts, and enormities.
Page 12 - ... by agreeing with other men to join and unite into a community for their comfortable, safe, and peaceable living one amongst another, in a secure enjoyment of their properties and a greater security against any that are not of it. This any number of men may do, because it injures not the freedom of the rest; they are left as they were in the liberty of the state of nature. When any number of men have so consented to make one community or government, they are thereby presently incorporated and...
Page 48 - II. c. 5 ; which enacts, that whoever procures at Rome, or elsewhere, any translations, processes, excommunications, bulls, instruments, or other things which touch the king, against him, his Crown and realm ; and all persons aiding and assisting therein ; shall be put out of the king's protection, their lands and goods forfeited to the king's use, and they shall be attached by their bodies to answer to the king and his council...

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