The Commercial Forest Trees of Massachusetts: How You May Know Them

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Wright & Potter Printing Company, State Printers, 1907 - Forests and forestry - 66 pages
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Page 23 - Twig two-thirds natural size. scales. The recent shoots are short, stout and more or less covered with a downy growth. The leaves are large, strong-scented and hairy, composed of 7 to 9 obovate to oblong, pointed leaflets which turn a beautiful yellow in the fall. The flowers, like those of all other hickories, are of two kinds on the same tree ; the male in threebranched catkins, the female in clusters of 2 to 5.
Page 22 - ... clothed with short hairs. The fruit is borne singly or in pairs, and is globular. The husk is thick and deeply grooved at the seams. The nut is much compressed and pale, the shell thin, and the kernel sweet. The flowers are of two kinds, opening after the leaves have attained nearly their full size. The wood is heavy, hard, tough and very strong. It is used largely in the manufacture of agricultural implements and tool handles, and in the building of carriages and wagons. For fuel the hickories...
Page 25 - The poplars are quite widely distributed, extending from the Arctic circle to Mexico and from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The wood of poplars is very soft and light and especially liable to warp, but is cheap and useful for making toys, boxes and smaller furniture. Much of it now goes to the pulp mills.
Page 21 - The leaves are alternate, compound, from 6 to 10 inches long, and composed of from 7 to 11 leaflets. The individual leaflets are smaller and more slender than those of the other hickories. The flowers are of two kinds on the same tree. The fruit is about 1 inch long and thin-husked, while the nut is usually thin-shelled and brittle, and the kernel very bitter. The wood is hard, strong and heavy, reddish brown in color. From this last fact it gets its local name of red hickory. It is said to be somewhat...
Page 8 - The name red pine is appropriate both because of the pale red color of the heart-wood and the distinctly reddish cast of the bark. This species does not grow in Norway or elsewhere in Europe, and it is said that it received the name from the town of Norway, Maine. The name Norway pine...
Page 25 - The poplars are distributed quite widely, extending from the Arctic Circle to Mexico and from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The wood of poplars is very soft and light and especially liable to warp, but is cheap and useful for making toys, boxes and smaller furniture. Much of it now goes to the pulp mills.
Page 7 - Mill.) The shortleaf pine, also known as yellow or rosemary pine, is widely distributed throughout the eastern part of the State. It is the common pine of the hills and in the lowlands it forms pure stands. The young tree has a straight and stout stem with slightly SHORTLEAF PINE One-half natural size From Sargent's "Manual of the Trees of North America," by permission of Houghton-Mifflin Company ascending branches.
Page 54 - The individual leaflets are small, about an inch or an inch and a quarter in length and oval in outline.
Page 21 - BARK on the trunk is granite-gray, faintly tinged with yellow and less rough than in most of the hickories, yet broken into thin, plate-like scales. The winter buds are compressed, scurfy, bright yellow, quite different from those of its relatives. The LEAVES are alternate, compound, from 6 to 10 inches long, and composed of from 7 to 11 leaflets.
Page 28 - ... taper-pointed, bark c^ose White Birch Leaves ovate, saw-toothed, bark in easily separable layers, often ragged. .Paper Birch Bark dark-brown or black, close, sweet, aromatic Sweet Birch Bark silvery-yellow, in layers, often ragged Yellow Birch Introduced species.— The European white birch (B. alba) is commonly planted for ornamental purposes. It is a beautiful tree closely resembling the native white birch. There are numerous horticultural varieties, some with finely cut leaves and pendulous...

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