The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: With Historical and Analytical Prefaces, Comments, Critical and Explanatory Notes, Glossaries, and a Life of Shakespeare, Volume 13

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Page 99 - That palter with us in a double sense ; That keep the word of promise to our ear, And break it to our hope.
Page 185 - But Falstaff, unimitated, unimitable Falstaff, how shall I describe thee ? Thou compound of sense and vice; of sense which may be admired, but not esteemed; of vice which may be despised, but hardly detested.
Page 50 - ... murders committed by and through him ; and last of all, his odious death, by God's justice appointed. Done in such order as followeth, by Thomas Preston, 1570.
Page 225 - Wit ever wakeful, fancy busy and procreative as an insect, courage, an easy mind that, without cares of its own, is at once disposed to laugh away those of others, and yet to be interested in them, — these and all congenial qualities, melting into the common copula of them all, the man of rank and the gentleman, with all its excellences and all its weaknesses, constitute the character of Mercutio ! Act i.
Page 50 - Caliban, on the other hand, is all earth, all condensed and gross in feelings and images ; he has the dawnings of understanding without reason or the moral sense, and in him, as in some brute animals, this advance to the intellectual faculties, without the moral sense, is marked by the appearance of vice.
Page 187 - ... gives the greatest revulsion to the frame. This depth of nature, this force of passion, this tug and war of the elements of our being, this firm faith in filial piety, and the giddy anarchy and whirling tumult of the thoughts at finding this prop failing it, the contrast between the fixed, immovable basis of natural affection, and the rapid, irregular starts of imagination, suddenly wrenched from all its accustomed holds and resting-places in the soul, this is what Shakespear has given, and what...
Page 148 - In Hamlet this balance is disturbed: his thoughts, and the images of his fancy, are far more vivid than his actual perceptions, and his very perceptions, instantly passing through the medium of his contemplations, acquire, as they pass, a form and a color not naturally their own. Hence we see a great, an almost enormous, intellectual activity, and a proportionate aversion to real action consequent upon it, with all its symptoms and accompanying qualities.
Page 148 - Hamlet he seems to have wished to exemplify the moral necessity of a due balance between our attention to the objects of our senses, and our meditation on the workings of our minds, — an equilibrium between the real and the imaginary worlds.
Page 44 - I had before descried faults ;) surely, nothing can seem more discordant with our historical preconceptions of Brutus, or more lowering to the intellect of the StoicoPlatonic tyrannicide, than the tenets here attributed to him — to him, the stern Roman republican ; namely, — that he would have no objection to a king, or to Caesar...
Page 208 - The satire is chiefly on follies of words. Biron and Rosaline are evidently the pre-existent state of Benedict and Beatrice, and so, perhaps, is Boyet of Lafeu, and Costard of the Tapster in Measure for Measure ; and the frequency of the rhymes, the sweetness as well as the smoothness of the metre, and the number of acute and fancifully illustrated aphorisms, are all as they ought to be in a poet's youth.

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