The Constitution of England: Or, An Account of the English Government: in which it is Compared, Both with the Republican Form of Government, and the Other Monarchies in England

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G.G.J. and J. Robinson and J. Murray, 1789 - Constitutions - 540 pages
 

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Page 45 - ... them without danger. But the king of England continued, even in the time of the Tudors, to have but one assembly before which he could lay his wants, and apply for relief. How great soever the increase of his power was, a single parliament...
Page 34 - In spite of his reluctance, and after many evasions unworthy of so great a king, Edward was obliged to confirm the Great Charter ; he even confirmed it eleven times in the course of his reign. It was moreover enacted, that whatever should be done contrary to it, should be null and void ; that it should be read twice a year in all cathedrals ; and that the penalty of excommunication...
Page 54 - Second, therefore, was called over ; and he experienced on the part of the people that enthusiasm of affection which usually attends the return from a long alienation. He could not, however, bring himself to forgive them the inexpiable crime of which he looked upon them to have been guilty. He saw with the deepest concern that they still entertained their former notions with regard to the nature of the royal prerogative ; and, bent upon the recovery of the ancient powers of the crown, he only waited...
Page 53 - ... common business of government, is, of all attempts, the most chimerical; that the authority of all, with which men are amused, is, in reality, no more than the authority of a few powerful individuals, who divide the republic among themselves...
Page 97 - M. st. 2. c. 2. as one of the liberties of the people, "that the freedom of speech, and debates, and proceedings in parliament, ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of parliament.
Page 317 - And, lastly, to vindicate these rights, when actually violated or attacked, the subjects of England are entitled, in the first place, to the regular administration and free course of justice in the courts of law; next, to the right of petitioning the king and parliament for redress of grievances; and, lastly, to the right of having and using arms for self-preservation and defence.
Page 66 - Houses has a negative on the propositions made by the other, and there is, consequently, no danger of their encroaching on each other's rights, or on those of the king, who has likewise his negative upon them both, any question judged by them conducive to the public good, without exception, may be made the subject of their respective deliberations. Such are, for instance, new limitations or extensions to be given to the authority of the king ; the establishing of new laws, or making changes in those...
Page 42 - ... seemed to open on the nation. But the long and violent agitation under which it had laboured was to be followed by a long and painful recovery. Henry, mounting the throne with...
Page 281 - And the English constitution has not only excluded from any share in the execution of the laws those in whom the people trust for the enacting them, but it has also taken from them what would have had the same pernicious influence on their deliberations — the hope of ever invading that executive authority, and transferring it to themselves. This authority has been made in England one single, indivisible prerogative: it has been made for ever the...
Page 242 - In the same manner, certain writers of the present age. misled by their inconsiderate admiration of the governments of ancient times, and perhaps also by a desire of presenting lively contrasts to what they call the degenerate manners of our modern times, have cried up the governments of Sparta and Rome, as the only ones fit for us to imitate.

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