The Crisis

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1901 - United States - 522 pages
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"The novel is set in the years leading up to the first battles of the U.S. Civil War, mostly in the divided state of Missouri. It follows the fortunes of young Stephen Brice, a man with Union and abolitionist sympathies, and his involvement with a Southern family."--Wikipedia.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
13
III
22
IV
29
V
42
VI
48
VII
56
VIII
63
XXVII
241
XXVIII
250
XXIX
255
XXX
261
XXXI
274
XXXII
283
XXXIII
294
XXXIV
310

IX
74
X
83
XI
90
XII
94
XIII
106
XIV
116
XV
123
XVI
133
XVII
141
XVIII
148
XIX
161
XX
177
XXI
186
XXII
192
XXIII
205
XXIV
213
XXV
220
XXVI
228
XXXV
324
XXXVI
332
XXXVII
338
XXXVIII
352
XXXIX
367
XL
377
XLI
385
XLII
400
XLIII
414
XLIV
427
XLV
438
XLVI
449
XLVII
466
XLVIII
471
XLIX
477
L
487
LI
499
LII
516

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Page 146 - Is it so bad then to be misunderstood? Pythagoras was misunderstood, and Socrates, and Jesus, and Luther, and Copernicus, and Galileo, and Newton, and every pure and wise spirit that ever took flesh. To be great is to be misunderstood.
Page 156 - Can the people of a United States Territory, in any lawful way, against the wish of any citizen of the United States, exclude slavery from its limits prior to the formation of a State constitution?
Page 79 - WE WILL SAY TO THE SOUTHERN DISUNIONISTS, WE WON'T GO OUT OF THE UNION, AND YOU SHAN'T...
Page 498 - Duncan is in his grave; After life's fitful fever he sleeps well; Treason has done his worst: nor steel, nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing Can touch him further.
Page 159 - It matters not what way the Supreme Court may hereafter decide as to the abstract question whether slavery may or may not go into a Territory under the Constitution, the people have the lawful means to introduce it or exclude it as they please, for the reason that slavery cannot exist a day or an hour anywhere, unless it is supported by local police regulations.
Page 214 - Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, Duke of Saxony, Duke of Cornwall and Rothesay, Earl of Chester and Carrick, Baron Renfrew, and Lord of the Isles.
Page 341 - Rather," said he (he was still seated, and spoke deliberately, slowly, and with a peculiar emphasis), " rather than concede to the State of Missouri the right to demand that my government shall not enlist troops within her limits, or bring troops into the state whenever it pleases, or move its troops at its own will into, out of, or through the state ; rather than concede to the State of Missouri for one single instant the right to dictate to my government in any matter however unimportant, I would...
Page 457 - ... Mr. Brinsmade came forward, with his hand outstretched. "Comyn," said he, his voice breaking a little, "I have known you these many years as a man of unstained honor. You are safe with me. I ask no questions. God will judge whether I have done my duty." Mr. Carvel took his friend's hand. "Thank you, Calvin," he said. "I give you my word of honor as a gentleman that I came into this city for no other reason than to see my daughter. And hearing that my old friend was dying, I could not resist the...
Page 282 - Away down South in de fields of cotton Cinnamon seed, and sandy bottom! Look away, look away, look away, look awa>.
Page 490 - Lincoln was sitting under the lamp, slouched down in his chair, in the position I remembered so well. It was as if I had left him but yesterday. He was whittling, and he had made some little toy for his son Tad, who ran out as I entered. When he saw me, the President rose to his great height, a sombre, towering figure in black. He wears a scraggly beard now. But the sad smile, the kindly eyes in their dark caverns, the voice — all were just the same. I stopped when I looked upon the face. It was...

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