The Crying Rocks

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Simon and Schuster, 2003 - Juvenile Fiction - 199 pages
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About Joelle's life before she was found -- brought in from the railway depot, a scrawny five-year-old child -- there isn't a lot known for sure.

"And don't ask me! I can't remember anything," she snaps at anyone who pries, including the weird kid named Carlos who sits in the back row in Spanish class. But when Carlos, collector of arrowheads and Native American lore, tells her she looks like a girl in an old painting of Rhode Island's Narragansett Indians, Joelle can't help sneaking a look. She's surprised by a flicker of recognition.

It's Carlos who leads her through the forest to the ancient Crying Rocks, where howls on windy days are thought to be the spirit voices of children long ago, flung from the boulders to early death. The terrible story draws Joelle into the downdraft of her own memory, to a window, a shadowy mother, a freight train escape from Chicago. It also leads her toward the history of a lost American people, and the discovery of a rare kind of courage that runs deep in her family.


About Joelle's life before she was found -- brought in from the railway depot, a scrawny five-year-old child -- there isn't a lot known for sure.

"And don't ask me! I can't remember anything," she snaps at anyone who pries, including the weird kid named Carlos who sits in the back row in Spanish class. But when Carlos, collector of arrowheads and Native American lore, tells her she looks like a girl in an old painting of Rhode Island's Narragansett Indians, Joelle can't help sneaking a look. She's surprised by a flicker of recognition.

It's Carlos who leads her through the forest to the ancient Crying Rocks, where howls on windy days are thought to be the spirit voices of children long ago, flung from the boulders to early death. The terrible story draws Joelle into the downdraft of her own memory, to a window, a shadowy mother, a freight train escape from Chicago. It also leads her toward the history of a lost American people, and the discovery of a rare kind of courage that runs deep in her family.

 

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User Review  - Jdonldsn - LibraryThing

In this courageous and spirited “Who am I and where did I come from?” story of two thirteen year-olds, readers will ride the emotional roller coaster until they glide into the end that leaves the ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
21
Section 2
30
Section 3
43
Section 4
59
Section 5
83
Section 6
93
Section 7
117
Section 8
137
Section 9
149
Section 10
156
Section 11
163
Section 12
173
Section 13
193
Section 14
200
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Janet Taylor Lisle's novels for young readers include five selected as Best Books of the Year by School Library Journal: Sirens and Spies, The Lampfish of Twill, Forest, A Message from the Match Girl (from the Investigators of the Unknown series), and Afternoon of the Elves, a Newbery Honor Book. Her most recent title for Atheneum is The Art of Keeping Cool, a Horn Book Fanfare title and winner of the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction.

She lives with her family on the coast of Rhode Island.

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