The Cultural Industries

Front Cover
′The first edition of The Cultural Industries moved us irrevocably past the tired debates between political economy and cultural studies approaches. This second edition takes on new and vital targets, for example claims that the Internet is replacing television in everyday media consumption.... In the process, Hesmondhalgh provides us with an essential toolkit for making critical sense of the digital media age, and our places within it′ - Nick Couldry, Goldsmiths College, University Of London

′This book sets a valuable standard for communication studies. Hesmondhalgh integrates cultural research with political economy, organizational sociology with public communication policy studies, global with comparative analysis, and intellectual property law with technology changes. I′ve successfully taught graduate and undergraduate courses in the USA and France using the first edition, and this one is better still′ - John D.H. Downing, Global Media Research Centre, Southern Illinois University

Praise for the first edition:

′This lucid, careful and sophisticated book orders the entire field, for the US as well as Europe, and at one stroke becomes the state of the art, the standard′ - Todd Gitlin, Columbia University, USA

This book is a powerful antidote to journalistic hype about change in the cultural industries. Significantly expanding, updating and revising an acclaimed first edition published in 2002, it

analyses how, why and in what ways cultural production has changed since the 1980s

guides the reader through existing approaches

scrutinises facts and debates about the role of culture and creativity in modern societies

provides new material on copyright, cultural policy, celebrity power, the digital distribution of music and many other issues

Like its predecessor, this exciting new edition of The Cultural Industries places transformation in the cultural industries in long-term political, economic and cultural context. In doing so, Hesmondhalgh offers a distinctive critical approach to cultural production, drawing on political economy perspectives, but also on cultural studies, sociology and social theory.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

XIII
29
XIV
30
XV
31
XVI
33
XVII
34
XVIII
51
XX
55
XXI
58
LIII
176
LIV
177
LV
184
LVI
189
LVII
193
LVIII
197
LIX
199
LX
202

XXII
64
XXIII
70
XXIV
73
XXV
75
XXVI
80
XXVIII
82
XXIX
83
XXX
84
XXXI
89
XXXIII
103
XXXIV
105
XXXV
109
XXXVI
111
XXXVII
113
XXXVIII
116
XXXIX
119
XL
122
XLI
127
XLII
131
XLIII
137
XLIV
138
XLV
149
XLVI
157
XLVII
159
XLVIII
160
XLIX
164
L
168
LI
170
LII
174
LXI
205
LXII
212
LXIII
213
LXIV
214
LXV
219
LXVI
228
LXVII
235
LXVIII
240
LXX
242
LXXI
244
LXXII
246
LXXIII
249
LXXIV
255
LXXV
257
LXXVI
258
LXXVII
261
LXXVIII
263
LXXIX
270
LXXX
271
LXXXI
278
LXXXII
289
LXXXIII
299
LXXXV
304
LXXXVI
306
LXXXVII
307
LXXXVIII
309
LXXXIX
314
XC
335
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

David Hesmondhalgh is Professor of Media, Music and Culture in the School of Media and Communication at the University of Leeds. He is the author of The Cultural Industries (4th edition, 2019, previous editions 2002, 2007 and 2013); Culture, Economy and Politics: The Case of New Labour (Palgrave, 2015, co-written with Kate Oakley, David Lee and Melissa Nisbett); Why Music Matters (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013); and Creative Labour: Media Work in Three Cultural Industries (Routledge, 2011, co-written with Sarah Baker). He is also editor or co-editor of seven other books on media, music and culture, including Media and Society (with James Curran, 6th edition, Bloomsbury, 2019) The Media and Social Theory (Routledge, with Jason Toynbee, 2008) and Western Music and its Others (University of California Press, with Georgina Born, 2000).

Bibliographic information