"The Dark People": Russia's Crisis

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Macmillan, 1918 - Peasantry - 226 pages
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Page 231 - A novel of unrest, ... a dramatization of labor under present conditions. The story of a strike is told with graphic power, and the treatment of the men and women who share the tidal movement of antagonism has a kind of epical breadth and energy. . . . THE HARBOR will awaken protest, cause irritation, and will be regarded as an essentially revolutionary story; but its underlying motive is constructive.
Page 231 - ... described and the disturbance which is predicted, the story makes one realize the possibilities of growth in intelligence, self-command, and efficiency of the working class blindly striving to better themselves, and striving with as much purity of motive as the other classes in society. " The Harbor " will awaken protest, cause irritation, and will be regarded as an essentially revolutionary story ; but its underlying motive is constructive.
Page 225 - ... to hunt in my mind for my thoughts as though they were lost in the dark, I work on the fields and I know I am thinking, but nothing seems clear to me. Sometimes I am not even sure what I am thinking about, and so I go on with my work. But then suddenly, like a flash of lightening in the night that shows you just for a moment every house in the village, so my whole mind is lighted up." The same observation is to be heard in Semen Kanatchikov's memoir in his recollection of his mental processes...
Page 162 - And he would set before me a pot of clear bitter coffee, and a small chunk of soggy black bread. But when I made trips to the villages, in peasant huts I would be regaled by my hospitable host with white bread, rich, fresh milk, and also eggs and butter. I would fatten on the land for a time, and then would return to my meager life in that starved, elaborate hotel. "Not only was food scarce in the towns, but the people were dreading the...
Page 162 - Not only was food scarce in the towns, but the people were dreading the winter with the low supply of fuel on hand, especially in Moscow. For, as a rule, the Russians use stove wood to heat their homes and, though the peasants had not seized the forests, they felt that these forests would soon be their own; therefore, last summer they refused to cut firewood for the towns.
Page 231 - ... of capital can render to the community through their power of foresight and their resources. There is a charming love story running through the book, which humanizes its hardness and incidentally gives us a picture of a very human and lovely type of woman. The novel is a dramatization of the unrest of labor under present conditions. The story of a strike is told with graphic power ; and the treatment of the ignorant and unhappy men and women who share the tidal movement of antagonism has a kind...
Page 224 - ... enlightenment experienced this kind of change in their own mental processes. Ernest Poole met a remarkable peasant woman in a benighted central Russian village in 1918 whose horizons had been broadened by travel. She told him, I have to hunt in my mind for my thoughts as though they were lost in the dark, I work on the fields and I know I am thinking, but nothing seems clear to me. Sometimes I am not even sure what I am thinking about, and so I go on with my work. But then suddenly, like a flash...
Page 224 - ... There is evidence to suggest that Russian peasants who determined to pursue enlightenment experienced this kind of change in their own mental processes. Ernest Poole met a remarkable peasant woman in a benighted central Russian village in 1918 whose horizons had been broadened by travel. She told him, I have to hunt in my mind for my thoughts as though they were lost in the dark, I work on the fields and I know I am thinking, but nothing seems clear to me. Sometimes I am not even sure what I...
Page 60 - we must understand. We must realize that Russia may not settle down for years. And we should not wait for that ; we should seize every possible chance to give aid " — or the Germans, superior in civilization to the Russians, will do it — " we should work as hard as they. We should grimly refuse to be disheartened or give up, no matter what disappointments fall...
Page 123 - ... the Bolsheviki will settle down to a long protracted series of deep and fundamental reforms, that will first meet the immediate needs and will then lead slowly through the years to that same co-operative commonwealth which both they and the co-operatives and socialists of every kind throughout the world have dreamed of.

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