The Defendant

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J.M. Dent, 1902 - 131 pages
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Page 46 - Far and few, far and few, Are the lands where the Jumblies live: Their heads are green, and their hands are blue; And they went to sea in a sieve.
Page 47 - Every great literature has always been allegorical — allegorical of some view of the whole universe. The Iliad is only great because all life is a battle, the Odyssey because all life is a journey, the Book of Job because all life is a riddle.
Page 47 - The principle of art for art's sake is a very good principle if it means that there is a vital distinction between the earth and the tree that has its roots in the earth; but it is a very bad principle if it means that the tree could grow just as well with its roots in the air.
Page 120 - The narrowest street possesses, in every crook and twist of its intention, the soul of the man who built it, perhaps long in his grave. Every brick has as human a hieroglyph as if it were a graven brick of Babylon ; every slate on the roof is as educational a document as if it were a slate covered with addition and subtraction sums.
Page 49 - ... wonder at it. It is when we consider it as a prodigious wave of the living soil sprawling up to the skies for no reason in particular that we take off our hats, to the astonishment of the park-keeper. Everything has in fact another side to it, like the moon, the patroness of nonsense. Viewed from that other side, a bird is a blossom broken loose from its chain of stalk, a man a quadruped begging on its hind legs, a house a gigantesque hat to cover a man from the sun, a chair an apparatus of four...
Page 36 - A creed is a rod, And a crown is of night; But this thing is God, To be man with thy might, To grow straight in the strength of thy spirit, and live out thy life as the light.
Page 42 - That it is good for a man to realize that he is " the heir of all the ages " is pretty commonly admitted ; it is a less popular but equally important point that it is good for him sometimes to realize that he is not only an ancestor, but an ancestor...
Page 13 - In the case of our own class, we recognise that this wild life is contemplated with pleasure by the young, not because it is like their own life, but because it is different from it. It might at least cross our minds that, for whatever other reason the errand-boy reads " The Red Revenge," it really is not because he is dripping with the gore of his own friends and relatives. In this matter, as in all such matters, we lose our bearings entirely by speaking of the "lower classes" when we mean humanity...
Page 13 - I have invited twenty-five factory hands to tea." If he said, "I have invited twenty-five chartered accountants to tea," every one would see the humour of so simple a classification.
Page 46 - Pobble is better without his toes," which is beyond the reach of Carroll. The poet seems so easy on the matter that we are almost driven to pretend that we see his meaning, that we know the peculiar difficulties of a Pobble, that we are as old travellers in the " Gromboolian Plain " as he is. Our claim that nonsense is a new literature (we might almost say a new sense) would be quite indefensible if nonsense were nothing more than a mere aesthetic fancy. Nothing sublimely artistic has ever arisen...

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