The Dramatic Authors of America

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G.B. Zieber & Company, 1845 - American drama - 144 pages
 

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Page 143 - Yes, trust them not: for there is an upstart crow beautified with our feathers, that with his tiger's heart, wrapt in a player's hide, supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you; and being an absolute Johannes factotum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country.
Page 82 - PITY the sorrows of a poor old man, Whose trembling limbs have borne him to your door. Whose days are dwindled to the shortest span, Oh ! give relief and heaven will bless your store.
Page 78 - How calm his exit ! Night-dews fall not more gently to the ground, Nor weary worn-out winds expire so soft. Behold him ! in the evening tide of life, A life well spent, whose early care it was His riper years should not upbraid his green : By unperceived degrees he wears away ; Yet, like the sun, seems larger at his setting...
Page 128 - ... who had that day arrived in Philadelphia, after an absence of several years. The first salutation was scarcely over, when the curtain fell, and the author's friend innocently remarked, " Well, this is really the most insufferable trash that I have witnessed for some time.
Page 50 - The senators half rose, in expectation of seeing the ' ' gentle Desdemona, " when lo ! the maiden from the country stepped from the box plump on the stage, and advanced toward the expecting Moor ! It is impossible to give any idea of the confusion that followed. The audience clapped and cheered — the duke and senators forgot their dignity — the girl was ready to sink with consternation — even Cooper himself could not help joining in the general mirth. The uproar lasted for several minutes,...
Page 29 - ... drama. There is, however, one who stands out prominent as the great American star, who is to this country what Talma is to France — what Garrick is to England — the noblest representative of his nation's drama — aye, we may say, more the creator of our national drama — for Edwin Forrest has done more, individually, than all the theatres in the country combined, to draw forth and reward the talents of native dramatists.
Page 128 - The Bravo." As an evidence of his facility in composition, it may be mentioned that several of his pieces have been written and performed at a week's notice. The entire last act of "William Penn" was written on the afternoon of the day previous to its performance, yet this hasty production ran ten successive nights, drawing full houses, and has since been several times revived. His " Deformed
Page 22 - Hum! yes, in mine own way; Marry, 'twas not with sighs and folded arms; For mirth I sought in it, not misery. Sir, I have ambled through all love's gradations Most jollily, and seriously the whilst. I have sworn oaths of love on my knee, yet laugh'd not; Complaints and chidings heard, but heeded not; Kiss'd the cheek clear from tear-drops, and yet wept not; Listen'd to vows of truth, which I believed not; And after have been jilted — PERCY. Well! ROLFE. And car'd not. PERCY. Call you this loving?
Page 144 - The sand heaped by one flood is scattered by another, but the rock always continues in its place. The stream of time, which is continually washing the dissoluble fabrics of other poets, passes without injury by the adamant of Shakespeare.
Page 49 - The fame of the great tragedian had drawn a crowded audience, composed of every description of persons, and among the rest a country lass of sixteen, whom (not knowing her real name) we will call Peggy. Peggy had never before seen the inside of a playhouse. She entered at the time Othello was making his defence before the duke and senators.

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