The Dramatic History of Master Edward: Miss Ann, and Others, the Extraordinaries of These Times. Collected from Zaphaniel's Original Papers. By George Alexander Stevens, ... To which are Prefixed, Memoirs of the Life of the Author

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J. Murray, 1785 - English drama - 194 pages
 

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Page x - ... become impaired, he sold the property in his work to Mr. Lee Lewes, a comedian of some eminence, who endeavoured, but without success, to catch the spirit of the original author. The Lecture on Heads will probably never again meet with the favour it formerly obtained. It was the misfortune of Stevens that his mind and body did not keep pace with, each other in their decay. He sunk by degrees into a state of all others the most distressing to those who have any connexions, either of friendship...
Page vi - Court, &c. and wrote many at the songs for which he has since been applauded. His finances were generally at a low ebb, and his person in durance. He experienced the extremes of mirth and jollity, as •well as want and dependance ; and led a life, if unstained by crimes, yet despicable for its meanness and irregularity.
Page iv - Repentant, 8vo. jl 75 1, affords us reason to suppose that the tenor of his life had not been much influenced by the rules of piety or virtue ; for thus he describes himself: " By chance condemn'd to wander from my birth, An erring exile o'er the face of earth ; Wild through the world of vice, — licentious race ! I've...
Page viii - Shuter he composed the first sketch of his Lecture on Heads, which is said to have owed its origin to his meeting, in one of his strolling excursions, with a country mechanic who described the members of the corporation with great force of humour. Whether the humour of the piece was...
Page v - I've started folly, and enjoy 'd the chace : " Pleas'd with each passion, I pursu'd their aim, " Cheer'd the gay pack, and grasp'd the guilty game ; " Revel'd regardless, leap'd reflection o'er, " Till youth, till health, fame, fortune, are no more. " Too late I feel the thought-corroding pain " Of sharp remembrance and severe disdain : " Each painted pleasure its avenger breeds, " Sorrow's sad train to Riot's troop succeeds ; " Slow-wasting Sickness steals un swift debauch ; " Contempt on pride,...
Page v - This poem was written during a fit of illness, and, probably, made no longer impression than until health returned. The next year, 1752> he was playing in Dublin. The year following he came to London, and obtained an engagement at Covent garden theatre ; where he acted without any applause, to which, indeed, his performances on the stage were in no respect entitled. In 1754 he published a poem, called The Birth Day of J''olly, in imitation of The Dunciad ; but proceeded in the design no further than...
Page x - ... last time himself, and afterwards repeated his Lecture On Heads both in London and several other places; when, at length, finding his facuties become impaired, he sold the property in his work to Mr. Lee Lewes, a comedian of some eminence, who endeavoured, but without success, to catch the spirit of the original author. The Lecture on Heads will probably never again meet with the favour it formerly obtained. It was the misfortune of Stevens that his mind and body did not keep pace with each other...
Page 138 - From this work it appears that she first appeared, as a dancer, at Sadler's Wells ; and as " she was extremely agreeable in her figure, and the novelty of her dancing added to it, with her excellence in her execution, she soon grew to be a favorite with the town ; and at the ensuing season was engaged at Covent Garden play-house. She became vastly celebrated, admired, imitated, and followed by every body.
Page vi - January 1755, thetheatre in the Haymarket was opened with an entertainment ridiculing Macklin's British Inquisition, and called The Female Inquisition: by a lady. It was supposed to be written by our author, who delivered a proemium and peroration ; but, though aided by the assistance of Miss Isabella Wilkinson's exhibitions on the wire, it ended without any advantage to the adventurers, after being four times repeated. At .this period Mr. Stevens was celebrated at several convivial societies then...
Page viii - Shuter, or whether he was inadequate to the task, it is certain it was at first scarcely noticed. Luckily for the author, he was prompted to enlarge his plan ; and, having furnished himself with a complete apparatus, he went into the country, and repeated his Lecture with so much success, at various places ,in Great Britain, Ireland, and America, that he was soon enabled roí., i. to amass and remit home several large sums of money ; by which he secured himself in affluence during the rest of his...

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