The Dynamics of Human Communication: A Laboratory Approach

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McGraw-Hill, Jan 1, 1988 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 436 pages
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Contents

Chapter 1You and Your Communication
3
Models and Definitions
9
A Set of Transactional Principles
16
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Inspiration for this insightfully humorous and whimsical story came from the author's 1947 magazine assignment following the rugged Trail of Hernan Cortez, mostly on foot or burros, from Vera Cruz through still wildly primitive mountainous terrain to Mexico City. Gail Myers, a native of South Dakota, is also author of a coming-of-age novel "The Crying Room" on barnstorming dance band years, four widely adopted college communication text books, many free-lance magazine and journal articles. His extensive career in higher education included variously his teaching, deaning, and presidenting, in Iowa, Colorado, Illinois, Pennsylvania. He's professor emeritus from Trinity U (Texas). Retired national consultant in organizational behavior based in Ohio, he now lives in historic Jacksonville, Oregon. His fictional Mexican village of La Vista is typical of so many other misnamed and poor isolated villages whose residents exist uneasily on a narrow edge of poverty. Then suddenly one year "miracles" started happening which brought a full year of prosperity. He writes with sensitive insight into the inner natures of natives who helped -- or hindered -- his tramping the Conquest's 300 slogging miles. Myers populated his fictional village with a wide range of honestly drawn and believable persons. This makes his very imaginative miracles feel like they were happening to those characters who he put on his pages in sincere understanding and deep affection for so many hardscrabble farmers, woodcutters, charcoal roasters, widows, herders, traders, gamblers, and even those gentle "sin verguenza" he met while trailing Cortez.

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