The Earth and Man: Lectures on Comparative Physical Geography in Its Relation to the History of Mankind

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Gould and Lincoln, 1853 - Human geography - 334 pages
 

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Page 269 - In the temperate climates all is activity and movement. The alternations of heat and cold, the changes of the seasons, a fresher and more bracing air, incite man to a constant struggle, to forethought, and to the vigorous employment of all his faculties. A more economical Nature yields nothing, except to the sweat of his brow; every gift on her part is a recompense for effort on his.
Page 23 - Has it not its sympathies and antipathies in those mysterious elective affinities of the different molecules of matter which chemistry investigates ? Has it not the powerful attractions of bodies to each other, which govern the motions of the stars scattered in the immensity of space, and keep them in an admirable harmony ? Do we not see, and always with a secret astonishment, the magnetic needle agitated at the approach of a particle of iron, and leaping under the fire of the Northern Light ? Place...
Page 268 - Since man is made to acquire the full possession and mastery of his facult.es by toil, and by the exercise of all his energies, no climate could so well minister to his progress in this work as the climate of the temperate continents. It is easy to understand this. An excessive heat enfeebles man ; it invites to repose and inaction. In the tropical regions the power of life in nature is carried to...
Page 268 - Excessive heat enfeebles man ; it invites to repose and inaction. In the tropical regions the power of life in nature is carried to its highest degree ; thus, with the tropical man...
Page 21 - It must endeavor to seize those incessant mutual actions of tho different portions of physical nature upon each other, of inorganic nature upon organized beings, upon man in particular, and upon the successive development of human societies; in a word, studying the reciprocal action of all these forces, the perpetual play of which constitutes what might be called the life of the globe, it should, if I may venture to say so, inquire into its physiology.
Page 126 - England cannot ripen the grape, almost under the same parallel where grow still the delicious wines of the Rhine. At Astracan, on the northern shore of the Caspian, Humboldt says., the grapes and fruits of every kind are as beautiful and luscious as in the Canaries and in Italy ; the wines...
Page 335 - With numerous Illustrations. By HUGH MILLER, author of " The Old Red Sandstone," &c. From the third London Edition. With a Memoir of the Author, by Louis AGASSIZ.
Page 82 - ... border them. Thus the Baltic Sea has a depth of only 120 feet between the coasts of Germany and those of Sweden, scarcely a twentieth part of that of Lago Maggiore, in the Italian Alps ; farther north, it becomes deeper. The Adriatic between Venice and Trieste has a depth of only 130 feet. In these two cases we see that the bed is only the continuation of the gentle inclination of the plains of Northern Germany and of Friuli. It is the same with the Northern Sea, and with those which wash the...
Page 154 - It hu-nes the vapors to the heights of the atmosphere, and the upper limit of the trade wind, where they are condensed and fall back in a deluge of rain. Now, as the sun passes and repasses from one tropic to the other, it follows that there is, in most intermediate places, a twofold rainy season, the...
Page 254 - ... man presents to our view his purest, his most perfect type, at the very centre of the temperate continents, at the centre of AsiaEurope, in the regions of Iran> of Armenia, and of the Caucasus ; and, departing from this geographical centre in the three grand directions of the lands, the types gradually lose the beauty of their forms, in proportion to their distance, even to the extreme...

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