The Economics of Welfare

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Cosimo, Inc., 2006 - Business & Economics - 428 pages
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Welfare economics is a branch of economics using microeconomic techniques to simultaneously determine the efficiency of the overall economy and the income distribution consequences associated with it. As a British economist best known for his work in many fields and particularly in welfare economics, Pigou attended the prestigious Harrow School and was a graduate of King's College, Cambridge, where he studied under Alfred Marshall, famously known as the creator of "The Marshall Plan." Here in The Economics of Welfare, Pigou asserts that individuals are the best judges of their own welfare, that people will prefer greater welfare to less welfare, and that welfare can be adequately measured either in monetary terms or as a relative preference. Scholars and students of both economics and welfare policy will find Pigou's work a significant contribution to current debates on welfare policy directions. Included in Volume I: "Welfare and The National Dividend" and "The Size of The National Dividend and The Distribution of Resources Among Different Uses" ALSO AVAILABLE AT COSIMO CLASSICS: The Economics of Welfare: Volume II ARTHUR CECIL PIGOU (1877-1959) was a Professor of Political Economy at Cambridge University from 1908 to 1943. He is best known for the development of "The Pigou Effect," an economics term, which refers to the stimulation of output & employment caused by increasing consumption. Pigou served on a number of royal commissions, including the 1919 committee on income tax.
 

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Contents

II
3
III
23
IV
31
V
43
VI
50
VII
56
VIII
82
IX
87
XX
158
XXI
167
XXII
172
XXIII
204
XXIV
213
XXV
229
XXVI
243
XXVII
250

X
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XI
106
XII
123
XIII
125
XIV
127
XV
131
XVI
136
XVII
142
XVIII
144
XIX
149
XXVIII
266
XXIX
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XXX
275
XXXI
290
XXXII
318
XXXIII
329
XXXIV
336
XXXV
381
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Page 4 - Political Economy or Economics is a study of mankind in the ordinary business of life; it examines that part of individual and social action which is most closely connected with the attainment and with the use of the material requisites of wellbeing.

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