The electronic privacy papers: documents on the battle for privacy in the age of surveillance

Front Cover
J. Wiley, Sep 8, 1997 - Computers - 747 pages
A collection of previously unreleased documents dealing with privacy in the Information Age.

Trying to keep up with the advancements in cryptography and digital telephony, the government has advocated controversial new tools that will allow them to monitor electronic communications. On the other side of the spectrum, privacy advocates are vehemently opposed to any government monitoring whatsoever. This book is a carefully selected and annotated collection of documents from both the government and the industry, enabling readers to fully understand governmental policies and how these will impact individuals and companies involved with the Internet.

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The electronic privacy papers: documents on the battle for privacy in the age of surveillance

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This is not an academically neutral book on the subject of privacy. Both Schneier and Banisar are security and privacy advocates of long standing, and they like to refer to the information ... Read full review

Contents

Roadblocks on the Information Superhighway
3
Overview of Wiretapping
9
Operation Root Canal
135
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

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About the author (1997)

BRUCE SCHNEIER is President of Counterpane Systems, a cryptography and data security firm. He is the author of Applied Cryptography (Wiley) and a contributing editor with Dr. Dobb's Journal.

DAVID BANISAR is an attorney with the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), editor of The International Privacy Bulletin, and contributing editor with Privacy Times.