The Elements of English Grammar: So Arranged as to Combine the Analytical and Synthetical Methods, with an Introduction for Beginners, Various Exercises, Oral and Written, for the Formation, Analysis, Transformation, and Classification, and Correction of Sentences

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Thomas, Cowperthwait, 1862 - English language - 220 pages
 

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Page 220 - Or of the eternal co-eternal beam, May I express thee unblamed ? since God is light, And never but in unapproached light Dwelt from eternity, dwelt then in thee, Bright effluence of bright essence increate. Or hear'st thou rather pure ethereal stream, Whose fountain who shall tell? before the sun, Before the heavens thou wert, and at the voice Of God, as with a mantle, didst invest The rising world of waters dark and deep, Won from the void and formless infinite.
Page 137 - I delivered the poor that cried, and the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me : and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy. I put on righteousness, and it clothed me : my judgment was as a robe and a diadem. I was eyes to the blind, and feet was I to the lame. I was a father to the poor : and the cause which I knew not I searched out.
Page 220 - The Morn is up again, the dewy Morn, With breath all incense, and with cheek all bloom — Laughing the clouds away with playful scorn, And living as if earth contained no tomb, — And glowing into day...
Page 138 - Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that. You take my house, when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house ; you take my life, When you do take the means whereby I live.
Page 211 - Its great tendency and purpose is, to carry the mind beyond and above the beaten, dusty, weary walks of ordinary life; to lift it into a purer element, and to breathe into it more profound and generous emotion.
Page 109 - The sound of that advancing multitude Which soon shall fill these deserts. From the ground Comes up the laugh of children, the soft voice Of maidens, and the sweet and solemn hymn Of Sabbath worshippers. The low of herds Blends with the rustling of the heavy grain Over the dark brown furrows. All at once A fresher wind sweeps by, and breaks my dream, And I am in the •wilderness alone.
Page 211 - Dryden, whose education was more scholastic, and who before he became an author had been allowed more time for study, with better means of information. His mind has a larger range, and he collects his images and illustrations from a...
Page 211 - Philosophers assert, that Nature is unlimited in her operations; that she has inexhaustible treasures in reserve; that knowledge will always be progressive ; and that all future generations will continue to make discoveries, of which we have not the least idea.
Page 147 - That it might take hold of the ends of the earth, That the wicked might be shaken out of it? It is turned as clay to the seal ; And they stand as a garment.
Page 7 - An improper diphthong is one in which one of the vowels is silent ; as, the a in heat. A triphthong is the union of three vowels in one syllable ; as, eau in beauty.

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