The elements of architecture

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G. Kirkham, 1685 - Architecture - 3 pages
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Page 206 - The next in order is the placing of the parts; about which (to leave as little as I may in my present labour, unto fancie, which is wilde and irregular) I will propound a rule of mine owne collection, upon which I fell in this maner. I had noted, that all arte was then in truest perfection, when it might bee reduced to...
Page 225 - Angles bee firmely bound, which are the Nerves of the whole Edifice, and therefore are commonly fortified by the Italians, even in their Bricke buildings, on each side of the corners, with well squared stone, yeelding both strength and grace And so much touching the entire or solid Wall.
Page 290 - Corinthian garnishment; so as if the great door be arched with some brave head, cut in fine stone or marble for the key of the arch, and two incumbent figures gracefully leaning upon it towards one another, as if they meant to...
Page 258 - In summe, all the Members great. The next betweene the Parts themselves, not only, considering their Breadths, and Lengths, as before, when wee spake of Doores and Windowes; but here likewise enters a third respect of Height, a point (I must confesse) hardly reduceable to any generall precept.
Page 202 - Men, a kind of good fellowship, and communication of their Principles. For you shall finde some of them, to be meerely Physicall, touching the quality and temper of the Aire: which being a perpetuall ambient, and ingredient, and the defects thereof, incorrigible in single Habitations (which I most intend) doth in those respects, require the more exquisite caution...
Page 284 - ... in a word ; it is true, that a story well set out with a good hand will every where take a judicious eye; but yet withal it is as true, that various colours on the out-walles of buildings have alwayes in them more delight than dignity : Therefore I would there admit no paintings but in black and white, nor even in that kinde any figures (if the roome be capable) under nine or ten foot high, which will require no ordinary artizan ; because the faults are more visible than in small designs. In...
Page 204 - By no means to build too near a great neighbour; which were in truth to be as unfortunately seated on the earth as Mercury is in the heavens, for the most part, ever in combustion, or obscurity, under brighter beams than his own.
Page 219 - First then concerning the Foundation, which requireth the exactest care; For if that happen to dance, it will marre all the 17 mirth in the House...
Page 249 - Those (as the very word may seeme 44 to import) did open outwards, These inwards; And were commonly of two Leaves or Panes, (as we call them) thereby requiring indeed, a lesser Circuit in their...
Page 301 - Next, before hee come to settle any imaginable opinion, let him by all meanes seeke to informe himselfe precisely, of the Age of the Worke upon which hee must passe his * "Doome. And if hee shall finde the apparent decayes to exceed the proportion of Time; then let him conclude without farther inquisition, as an absolute Decree, that either the Materials were too slight, or the Seate is nought. Now, after these...

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