The Emigrant's Guide: In Ten Letters, Addressed to the Tax-payers of England; Containing Information of Every Kind, Necessary to Persons who are about to Emigrate; Including Several Authentic and Most Interesting Letters Form English Emigrants, Now in America, to Their Relations in England

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The author, 1829 - Canada Emigration and immigration - 153 pages
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Page 1 - THE EMIGRANT'S GUIDE : In ten letters, addressed to the Tax-payers of England ; containing Information of every kind necessary to persons who are about to emigrate ; including several authentic and most interesting Letters from English Emigrants, now in America, to their Relations in England.
Page 40 - When arrived, you depend on the public authorities for a grant.of land. If you have money to purchase pieces of ground already cleared and cultivated, your servants are convicts, and you are at the joint mercy of them and the murdering natives. Even for the service of the convicts, your sole dependence is on the pleasure of the public authorities...
Page 78 - We take this opportunity to write to you to let you know that we are all well...
Page 67 - Tell Thomas Arann to come to America; and tell him to leave his strap what he wears when he has nothing to eat in England, for some other halfstarved slave. Tell Miriam there's no sending children to bed without supper...
Page 50 - Meat we buy for 2 cents per pound. , John often talks of his grandmother, and says we could keep her without working. Whilst this letter is writing my wife is eating preserved peaches and bread, and washing them down with good whiskey and water.
Page 102 - ... sail than other ships, because the captain is everlastingly looking out. I have crossed the Atlantic three times in American ships, once in an English merchant ship, once in a king's ship, and once in a king's packet; and I declare, that the superiority of the Americans is indeed, so decisive, that, if I were going to cross again, nothing should prevail on me to go on board of any ship but an American one. I never knew an American captain to take off his clothes to go to bed, during the whole...
Page 74 - We take the opportunity of sending these few lines to you, hoping this will find you all in good health, as this leaves us at present, thanks be to god for all his mercies to us.
Page 73 - May; the younger died with bowel complaint, the other with rash fever and soar throat. We were very much hurt to have them buried in a watery grave. We mourned their loss; night and day they were not out of our minds. We had a minister on board, who prayed with us twice a day: he was a great comfort to us, on account of losing our poor little children. He...
Page 79 - I can look out of my sash-window right into th» river. A very fruitful place; for apples, cherries, raspberries, grapes, plums, growing any where, any one may get them without money, what they please. Dear mother, I fear you will be troubled to read that side, it is put so thick ; for my paper is not half big- enough to say all that I want to say: but this I can say, that we want for nothing; bless God for it; for we can buy a leg of mutton every day, and green pease or French beans brought to the...
Page 74 - ... love to our brothers and sisters; and if they are disposed to come, I should like them to it, for here is plenty to eat and drink, and plenty of work. We work long days from sunrise to sunset ; a person...

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