The Entrepreneur: An Economic Theory

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Edward Elgar Publishing, Jan 1, 2003 - Business & Economics - 271 pages
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This is a second edition on the economic theory of entrepreneurship.
 

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This is an excellent synthesis of key developments concerning the theory of entrepreneurship and deserves a wide audience within the social sciences.' -- Chih-cheng Yang, Economic Issues 'The debates are still fresh and contemporaneous, and the language is rigorous and fluid. The book is still original. Not only does it provide a fairly easily digestible review of the main functions of the entrepreneurial process; it also synthesizes the relationship between the process and neo-classical economics... It is to be hoped that The Entrepreneur will be re-read by non-economists who ignore the economic theory of the entrepreneur. It ought to be recommended as a key text on masters programmes that deal with the theory of the firm, This is an important work for the field of entrepreneurship. Casson has again tried valiantly to restore the entrepreneur and the process of market making in the future to their rightful places in economic theory. The end result is a highly successful synthesis of key insights from neoclassical economics and Austrian theories into a broader analytical framework. By emphasizing the role of information, Casson has brought this second edition of The Entrepreneur more up-to-date with modern currents in economic theory 

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This is one the best books I have ever read.
Thank you Google.

Contents

Introduction
1
The significance of the entrepreneur
9
Basic concepts of the theory
19
The entrepreneur as intermediator
34
The competitive threat to the entrepreneur
43
Partial coordination the case of innovation
56
Making a market
79
Internal and external markets
106
Organizing the supply of market making services
146
Growth and dynamics of the firm
161
The market for entrepreneurs
188
Social mobility and the entrepreneur
200
Alternative theories of the entrepreneur
215
Conclusions
233
Bibliography
244
Index
265

The market for information
119
Speculative intermediation and the role of inventory management
135

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About the author (2003)

Mark Casson is Professor of Economics at the University of Reading, UK

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