The Epic of Columbus' Bell and Other Poems

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Press of the Reading eagle, 1900 - African American poets - 80 pages
 

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Page 68 - Strike ! Strike ! this is the nest," he cried, And rushed impetuous to the lead Of Liberty. On every side The patriots join with hasty speed, And follow him with purpose grand, Who durst for Freedom raise his hand. He shouts, he wields a knotted oak — It falls and sounds the battle note Fierce on their ranks. Redoubling stroke On stroke, his ample weapon smote Disorder'd ruin and dread discord, Full on the grim, advancing horde. Amazed they are, and rave with ire, Nor dare to brave where danger...
Page 76 - The king is 64 years old. He is tall, erect and majestic, and is deeply concerned about the colored people in America. He wanted to know when we were coming home. "During the great Ashantee war, he was captured by the English army and England tried to get him to sign away his territory and his people's land. He refused to do it, and they brought him here* to Sierre Leone as a prisoner, to be held until he signs away his kingdom.
Page 68 - ... speed, And follow him with purpose grand, Who durst for Freedom raise his hand. He shouts, he wields a knotted oak — It falls and sounds the battle note Fierce on their ranks. Redoubling stroke On stroke, his ample weapon smote Disorder'd ruin and dread discord, Full on the grim, advancing horde. Amazed they are, and rave with ire, Nor dare to brave where danger calls — They halt — now charge, and, charging, fire ; And Attucks' self, first martyr, falls, At Freedom's shrine : transfixed...
Page 73 - Pennsylvania, on one of his voyages. Its weight is sixty-four pounds. It belongs to the African Methodist Episcopal Church at Haleyville, to which it was presented by Captain Newell when the church was established there, about six years ago. There is a small debt of $190 on the church, and so highly do the people value their relic, the Columbus bell, that they will not suspend it upon the church lest by some mishap the church be sold for the debt, and they lose the bell, but it is securely kept at...
Page 77 - England will send him back at once in a man-ofwar. The African kings and nobility will make me hate England, grand as Old England is in many respects. The king walks about town, but cannot leave. He is loyal to his race and to his people. He will give his kingdom to his children in the United States, but not to England.
Page 75 - ... over the sea.' He means in America. I kissed his hands a dozen times, and would have kissed his feet had he not said, 'No, no.
Page 75 - England, and who is here as a prisoner of war, called to pay his respects, through me, to his race, as he says, 'over the sea.

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