The Essentials of the English Sentence

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D.C. Heath & Company, 1900 - English language - 310 pages
 

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Page 272 - Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls : Who steals my purse, steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing ; 'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands; But he that filches from me my good name, Robs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed. 32.
Page 272 - tis the mind that makes the body rich : And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honour peereth in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, Because his feathers are more beautiful ? Or is the adder better than the eel, Because his painted skin contents the eyes
Page 41 - 5. I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes like stars start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part, And each particular hair to stand on end.
Page 41 - Together, both ere the high lawns appeared Under the opening eyelids of the morn, We drove afield, and both together heard What time the gray-fly winds her sultry horn, Battening our flocks with the fresh dews of night.
Page 260 - Lo, the poor Indian ! whose untutored mind Sees God in clouds or hears him in the wind; His soul proud Science never taught to stray Far as the solar walk or milky way.
Page 249 - 7. Westward the course of empire takes its way; The four first acts already past, A fifth shall close the drama with the day: Time's noblest offspring is the last. 8.
Page 18 - The cognomen of Crane was not inapplicable to his person. He was tall, but exceedingly lank, with narrow shoulders, long arms and legs, hands that dangled a mile out of his sleeves, feet that might have served for shovels, and his whole frame most loosely
Page 18 - In this by-place of nature, there abode, in a remote period of American history, that is to say, some thirty years since, a worthy wight of the name of Ichabod Crane, who sojourned, or, as he expressed it, " tarried," in Sleepy Hollow, for the purpose of instructing the children of the vicinity.
Page 30 - Comfort thyself: what comfort is in me? I have lived my life, and that which I have done May He within himself make pure ! But thou, If thou shouldst never see my face again, Pray for my soul.
Page 249 - 4. Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine; Or leave a kiss but in the cup, And I'll not look for wine. 5.

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