The Fields of Dawn and Later Sonnets

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1900 - 105 pages
 

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Page 76 - Intrepid orator and statesman bold, At whose impetuous and impassioned words Men dropped the plowshares and took up their swords To fight for Freedom, in the days of oldForgotten art thou in this lust for gold, Although thy strong and stirring life records Deeds that were noble. But this ag'e rewards With calm neglect thy labors manifold. Champion of Liberty and of the Right; Brother in perilous arms, to Washington; Thou zealous Ruler of a glorious State — Is there no way thy service to requite?...
Page 21 - Oh, the wide River and her water-ways Whose currents draw us through their rocky gates, Winding between a thousand grassy aits To glorious greeneries in unlooked-for bays! The clustered islands swim in amber haze; And the rich sun, reluctant, slow awaits His destined setting, while he still creates Upon the golden tide one dazzling blaze. Silence around, save where the waters blue, Among the sedgy inlets in a dream, Gurgle unceasingly their liquid note; Then, leaning listless in our long canoe, With...
Page 71 - ... PORTALS SPIRIT of mine that soon must venturous spread Through voids unknown thy feeble, fluttering plumes, Hast thou no fear to wing those endless glooms ? No apprehension nor misgivings dread ? Those realms unfathomed of the speechless dead, Which never gleam of eldest star illumes — Lethean canyons that the Soul entombs — Art thou not awed such sombre vasts to tread ? My Soul replied : " Wisdom hath made all things — Life and the end of life, He gives to thee. Down Death's worn path...
Page 54 - THE radiant angel stands within her room. She kneels and listens ; on her heaving breast, To still its flutterings, are her sweet hands pressed, The while his lips foretell her joyful doom. Tears — happy tears — are rising, and a bloom Of maiden blushes clothes her that attest The Rose she is. The haloed, heavenly guest Lingers upon his cloud of golden gloom. He gives to her the lily which he brings. Each cherub in the aureole above — Where harps unseen are pealing peace and love — Smiles...
Page 30 - There is a legend the Algonquins tell Of power and splendor of the Great White One ; The God of Light he is, and of the Sun, And in their strange lore hath no parallel. He, in the Summer, from his citadel. Comes to the gates of his dominion, And throws them open when the day 's begun, And shuts them in the evening. But a spell...
Page 96 - ... at stake, and then to admit the existence of this hidden drama in his own household was to acknowledge the duplicity of his wife and her hard-heartedness as a another. How then could he continue to cherish the inward illusion on which his love for her was fed? (To be continued.) IN THE METEOPOLIS.
Page 96 - How can the sylvan poet dream his dream Amid the raging Babel round him thrown, — Canyons of brick paved with reverberate stone, The whirl of traffic, and the shriek of steam? But oh, far off from all the noise of these, To pace the shores that to the soul belong, In realms reclusive past the thought of care; — By the lone foam of sanctuary seas To hear drift on, in deeps of sunset air, The phantom caravels of deathless Song...
Page 22 - I drain a thousand streams, yet still I seek To lose myself within the Chesapeake In reedy inlets of the Indian bay.
Page 17 - ... each songster warble near her brood, And from the lowland where the mowers lay Came now and then faint fragrance from the hay, That touched the heart to reminiscent mood. We peered down wooded steeps, and saw the sun Shining in front, tip all the grape-vines wild, And edge with light the boulders...

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