The First Book of Birds

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1900 - Birds - 149 pages
 

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Page iii - Birds, intended primarily to interest young people in the ways and habits of birds and to stimulate them to further observation, but quite as well adapted for older people whose education in this delightful field has been neglected.
Page iii - It has therefore seemed to me that what is needed at first is not the science of ornithology, — however diluted, — but some account of the life and habits, to arouse sympathy and interest in the living bird, neither as a target nor as a producer of eggs, but as a fellow-creature whose acquaintance it would be pleasant to make.
Page 39 - ... some people who were fond of birds. The little one stood on the edge and watched his mother go in and splash and scatter the water. He fluttered his wings and was eager to try it for himself, but seemed afraid to plunge in. At last the mother flew away and left him standing there. In a moment she came back with a worm in her mouth. The young robin was hungry, as young birds always are. When he saw the worm, he began to flutter his wings and cry for it. But the mother jumped into the middle of...
Page 84 - A bird shows his intelligence in many ways. One is by the way he acts when he cannot do as he is used to doing. A robin I know of wished to build a nest, but could not find mud to put into it, for it was a very dry time, and there were no streams near. Now a robin's nest must have mud, and the bird seemed puzzled for a while.
Page i - Miller. . .With eight colored and twelve plain plates and twenty figures in the text.
Page 125 - ... and weeds that injure our crops. But there is more to be said about it. From morning till night, almost the whole of his life, nearly every bird is working for us. He does not know he is working for us, of course. He is simply hunting for the food he likes, and what is good for young birds to eat. But what he chooses to eat himself, and to feed the young, consists mostly of creatures that destroy our fruit and vegetables, caterpillars that eat the leaves off our trees, worms that get into our...
Page 38 - ... tired, and then they come down and alight again. Once I saw a young crow who did not fly when his parents called. All the others flew around many times. The mother's sharp eyes saw her naughty son. She flew right at him, and knocked him off his perch. The next time she called, he flew with the rest. An old robin wanted to teach her young one to bathe. She brought him to a dish of water kept for their use by some people who were fond of birds. The little one stood on the edge and watched his mother...
Page 35 - ... for something to eat. Thus he will get his first lesson in finding food for himself. Once I saw a woodpecker bring his little one to a fence close by some raspberry bushes. He fed the young bird two or three raspberries, and then quietly slipped away. When the young bird began to feel hungry, he cried out; but nobody came. Then he looked over at the raspberries and tried to reach one. After trying three or four times he got one. Then how proud he was ! The father stayed away an hour or more....
Page 62 - ... of themselves, and he is getting on his winter suit, or moulting. Then some morning all the bobolinks in the country are turned out of their homes in the meadows, by men and horses and mowing machines, for at that time the long grass is ready to cut. Then he begins to think about the wild rice that is getting just right to eat. Besides, he likes to take his long journey to South America in an easy way, stopping here and there as he goes. So some morning we miss his cheerful call, and if we go...
Page 39 - ... mother go in and splash and scatter the water. He fluttered his wings and was eager to try it for himself, but seemed afraid to plunge in. At last the mother flew away and left him standing there. In a moment she came back with a worm in her mouth. The young robin was hungry, as young birds always are. When he saw the worm, he began to flutter his wings and cry for it. But the mother jumped into the middle of the water dish and stood there, holding the worm in his sight. The little bird wanted...

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