The First Capture: Or, Hauling Down the Flag of England

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Saalfield Publishing Company, 1900 - United States - 248 pages
 

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Page 10 - So through the night rode Paul Revere ; And so through the night went his cry of alarm To every Middlesex village and farm, — A cry of defiance and not of fear, A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door, And a word that shall echo forevermore...
Page 7 - If the British march By land or sea from the town tonight, Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch Of the North Church tower as a signal light,— One, if by land, and two, if by sea; And I on the opposite shore will be, Ready to ride and spread the alarm Through every Middlesex village and farm, For the country folk to be up and to arm.
Page 248 - ... burst into tears. On her inquiring the cause, he informed her of what he had seen, and added, " If there is any one on this earth whom the Lord will listen to, it is George Washington ; and I feel a presentiment that under such a commander there can be no doubt of our eventually establishing our independence, and that God in his providence has willed it so.
Page 247 - Forge, he strolled up the creek, when, not far from his dam, he heard a solemn voice. He walked quietly in the direction of it, and saw Washington's horse tied to a sapling. In a thicket near by was the beloved chief upon his knees in prayer, his cheeks suffused with tears. Like Moses at the Bush, Isaac felt that he was upon holy ground, and withdrew unobserved. He was much agitated, and, on entering the room where his wife was, he burst into tears. On her inquiring the cause, he informed...
Page 11 - Ring ! ring !" Grasping the iron tongue of the old bell against which we are now leaning, backward and forward he hurled it a hundred times, its loud voice proclaiming " Liberty throughout all the land, unto all the inhabitants thereof.
Page 247 - Isaac Potts, at whose house Washington was quartered, relates that one day, while the Americans were encamped at Valley Forge, he strolled up the creek, when, not far from his dam, he heard a solemn voice. He walked quietly in the direction of it, and saw Washington's horse tied to a sapling. In a thicket near by was the beloved chief upon his knees in prayer, his cheeks suffused with tears. Like Moses at the Bush, Isaac felt that he was...
Page 248 - By the fervor of his prayer. But wouldst thou know his name Who wandered there alone? Go, read enrolled in Heaven's archives, The prayer of...
Page 98 - I didn't know but somebody was abusing him. You would have done the same thing, if you had been in my place, Mr. Hapley." " I would n't punish him any more, now, father,
Page 171 - Treat him as you would like to be treated if you were in his place.

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