The First Lines of English Grammar: Being a Brief Abstract of the Author's Larger Work, the "Institutes of English Grammar." Designed for Young Learners

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W. Wood & Company, 1866 - English language
 

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Page 96 - I went by the field of the slothful, and by the vineyard of the man void of understanding; And lo, it was all grown over with thorns, and nettles had covered the face thereof, and the stone wall thereof was broken down.
Page 106 - Sometimes a distant sail, gliding along the edge of the ocean, would be another theme of idle speculation. How interesting this fragment of a world, hastening to rejoin the great mass of existence!
Page 78 - If man's convenience, health, Or safety, interfere, his rights and claims Are paramount, and must extinguish theirs. Else they are all, the meanest things that are, As free to live and to enjoy that life As God was free to form them at the first, Who in his sovereign wisdom made them all. Ye, therefore, who love mercy, teach your sons To love it too.
Page 12 - Our sons their fathers' failing language see, And such as Chaucer is, shall Dryden be.
Page 89 - With too much knowledge for the Sceptic side, With too much weakness for the Stoic's pride, He hangs between, in doubt to act or rest; In doubt to deem himself a God or Beast; In doubt his mind or body to prefer; Born but to die, and reas'ning but to err; Alike in ignorance, his reason such, Whether he thinks too little or too much...
Page 114 - And the people with one accord gave heed unto those things which Philip spake, hearing and seeing the miracles which he did.
Page 110 - The only point where human bliss stands still, And tastes the good without the fall to ill ; Where only merit...
Page 116 - Thou hast brought a vine out of Egypt : Thou hast cast out the heathen, and planted it Thou preparedst room before it, And didst cause it to take deep root, and it filled the land. The hills were covered with the shadow of it, And the boughs thereof were like the goodly cedars. She sent out her boughs unto the sea, And her branches unto the river.
Page 89 - What though each spark of earth-born rapture fly The quivering lip, pale cheek, and closing eye! Bright to the soul thy seraph hands convey The morning dream of life's eternal day— Then, then, the triumph and the trance begin, And all the phoenix spirit burns within! Oh, deep-enchanting prelude to repose, The dawn of bliss, the twilight of our woes!
Page 46 - Singular. Plural 1. I may have loved, 1. We may have loved, 2. Thou mayst have loved, 2. You may have loved, 3. He may have loved ; 3. They may have loved.

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