The Floodmakers

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 2004 - Fiction - 176 pages
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Harry Buelle awakes confused one morning in his bathtub. His stepmother phones him, complaining that his father, a successful--and cantankerous--elderly playwright, has stopped taking his heart medicine. Harry has never heard her sound so tired, and, with his own life in shambles, agrees to join his parents--and his sister and her husband--at their Southern beach house retreat. Having the whole family together, cooped up in the same space, gives rise to old tensions and battles--the ache of childhood disappointments, the hurtful truth of parental expectations. But underneath the surface of a ritual family weekend lies a web of bitter secrets--and a staggering revelation. In taut, sparse, but never less than lyrical prose that mirrors the restraint and quiet desperation of its inhabitants, The Floodmakers delivers a carefully drawn glimpse into the complexities and frailties of family. With the same "delicate balance of poetic and precise language" (Cleveland Plain Dealer) and "splendid ambivalence" (The New York Times Book Review) that marked her previous novels, Mylene Dressler once again proves herself to be a startling force in fiction.

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The floodmakers

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A wounded sea bird sits helplessly in a box at the Buell family beach house on the Texas Gulf Coast. Harry Buell has come here at his stepmother's request to visit his aging playwright father, Dee ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
7
Section 3
19
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

Mylene Dressler was born in the Hague, Netherlands, and has lived in Europe, the United States, and Latin America. The author of the critically acclaimed The Medusa Tree, she now lives in Houston, where she is at work on her next book

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