The Flow of Gases in Furnaces

Front Cover
J. Wiley & sons, Incorporated, 1922 - Furnaces - 399 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 219 - ... commercial enterprise, and to determine the nature and thickness of the overburden in those areas. The investigation was begun at the instance of the United States Geological Survey, but the New Jersey Department of Conservation and Development cooperated...
Page 219 - ... giving up heat the brickwork temperature does not drop below the initial temperature of the incoming gases,, plus the temperature differential necessary for heat transfer. The most important variable, the period between reversals, is beyond the control of the furnace designer.
Page 11 - ... the difference between the weight of the air and the weight of the gas is diminished ; that is to say, the pressure becomes less and the balloon descends.
Page 40 - ... the weir-boxes were determined by the conditions necessary to the most accurate measurement for the size of weir needed. They were made 8 feet long, 6 feet wide, one 3.\ and the other 3 feet deep in the clear. The weirs are made in separate boards to fit the front of the box, and are interchangeable. The depth of the water flowing over the weir will be determined by a self-registering apparatus, the Wyoming Milometer, designed by State Engineer Mead, a cut of which is -given in his Second Annual...
Page 367 - TT* y alO00+ 10002' in which a is a constant common to all gases, equal to 6.5 and...
Page 16 - ... pressure. Chimney effects have been dealt with in some detail in Chapter VI to which readers are referred for methods of calculation. It is necessary here to distinguish between the chimney effect of a rising flue or chamber and the effect on the system of the main chimney. Boilers and those furnaces which have no working doors or openings for the charging of material to be heated operate by the draught provided. This creates the motive power necessary for moving the air through the furnace and...
Page 214 - Consett makes the total regenerator volume 2 cu m per tonne (70 cu ft), and makes the air chamber 10 per cent larger than the gas chamber, for furnaces designed to make four melts per twentyfour hours.
Page 220 - Under ordinary working conditions there should be two to eight reversals per hour, and it is necessary to proportion the checkerwork to suit the longest time period.
Page 114 - LEGS. The legs of the honey bee are highly modified for several special purposes besides that of walking, but they are so well known and have been so often described that it will not be necessary to devote much space to them here. The front legs (fig. 29 A) have a structure formed by the adjoining ends of the tibia and the first tarsal joint, which is called, on account of its use, the antenna cleaner. It consists (fig. 29 C) of a semicircular notch (dd) in the base of the first tarsal joint...
Page 147 - MICHIGAN forming the tunnel on the arc of a vertical circle, raising the central burning zone higher than the ends, so that in cooling the product the cold air will pass upwards as well as horizontally, and in heating the green ware the products of combustion will flow downwards as well as horizontally. This tunnel embodying the correct principles of up-draft cooling and down-draft...

Bibliographic information