The Flying Teuton: And Other Stories

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Macmillan, 1918 - 321 pages
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Page 4 - I'm as sure of that as I am that I'm sitting here. The love of it all — the Vive la France! you know, the grotesque fondness for Old Blighty that made them die for her — those weren't wiped out by getting into another atmosphere. It's all pretty much the same, you know, there and here, only there you apparently see the causes of things and the values. And you absoVOL. CXXXV.— No. 807.— 46 lutely can't hate. You see what a damned shame it was that anybody should ever have been ignorant enough...
Page 315 - In the Park, as if she felt relief at finding her objective, her pace slackened, and she stopped before a bench. ' Could we sit down ? ' she asked. Then when they were seated she turned to him and seemed to pounce. ' I must go away,' she said. Alan simply stared, not at her, but the thin ice half melted on the walk in front of them. He knew the answer, not to her but Nemesis, and he found himself nodding in confirmation of that inexorable deity. Annette was only the mouthpiece of the deity. ' Of...
Page 20 - German ship was to be aided, even by miracle, to sail back to Germany, but not to enter any foreign port. And we did go back to Germany, meeting meantime other German ships just out, and we hailed them and they saw us and answered. And the same fear was on the faces of every soul on board, and the news was in every case the same. They were, to all the ships of all the world, invisible. "We slunk into harbor, and I have never known how the captain met his company or what exporters said to the consignments...
Page 315 - She does want me, but that's because I needed her so terribly. She'd never seen anybody who needed her so much — anybody so gauche, ignorant, altogether poverty-stricken every way. She's made me over. She's given and given. And what have I done for her? Turned round and worshipped you." He could only keep on staring straight in front of him where now, at the edge of the shrubbery, a sparrow was pecking at some stony delicacy and stopping to bicker with its clan. Could he possibly, he thought, under...
Page 301 - He let himself in, and ranup-stairs to her sittingroom, where he knew exactly how he should find her, in a languor of endurance perpetually though innocently appealing to him. But the scene was startlingly of another sort. The room had lost its air of cloistered defense. The lights were not low; they were brilliant within their amber shades and they had paled the fireshine by contrast. Mildred herself was not on her couch, a harmony in lace and the delicate bloom of silk; she was pacing back and...
Page 5 - Teutonophobia any more since Kultur had got its medicine. Besides, wasn't the whole world chanting 'Vengeance is mine, saith the Lord'? and I'd begun to be awakened a little, too, in my inward parts, though I didn't talk much about it. The voyage began delightfully. I was the only American on board. The rest were merchants going over to take up relations with us again, and a brandnew consul or two. I didn't have much to do with any of those fellows, and the more things happened the more I didn't...
Page 300 - ... This was about the time that his wife, who was of an abnormally sensitive nature, degenerating through sheer laxness of will into physical cowardice, failed to answer her mother's summons to join her abroad. The mother, too, was a victim of fancies and a permanent malaise of living. She had traveled for years in search of serenity and to avoid herself, and now she wrote her daughter that she was sure the end was near. Would Mildred come? Mildred had no reason to believe the crisis was more acute...
Page 6 - I didn't have much to do with any of those fellows, and the more things happened the more I didn't see them. I didn't want to get all muddled up with the absurdity of the lay mind's attitude toward evidence. "Near evening on the second day something queer happened. It was foggy, and I was on deck, talking, in a desultory way, with the first mate, but really wondering if I'd got to sleep to the obbligato of the fog-horn all night, when suddenly out of the dark came the nose of a great ship. Our engines...
Page 19 - ... air. But my chief news, the only news that mattered, I got from the steward's face. It was yellow-white, and the eyes were full of that same apprehension I had learned to know now — the fear of the unknown. He brought sparse items he dropped in a whisper, as if he had been forbidden to speak and yet must speak or die — about the supply of water, the supply of coal. It was his theory that, when the coal actually gave out and the engines stopped, we should stay everlastingly tossing in the...
Page 233 - Has Mr. Abergenny been in New York?" ' ' Yes, for three days. He thinks it wise to go on once in a while to make the rounds of the editors. I fancy it's partly to see Park. He gets very homesick for him." Philippa was wrinkling her brow now, unbecomingly yet frankly, with a hard intensity. There was nothing of the wistful pray-do-tell-me-if-you-know about it that makes a girl's pure brow so charming. It said rather, "I'm thinking. In a few minutes I shall have weighed the matter.

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