The frontier forts of western Pennsylvania

Front Cover
Thomas Lynch Montgomery
W.S. Ray, state printer, 1916 - Fortification
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Contents

I
3
II
39
III
99
IV
159
V
194
VI
290
VII
323
VIII
325
LVII
419
LIX
420
LX
421
LXI
423
LXII
424
LXIII
425
LXV
426
LXVII
427

IX
332
X
337
XI
344
XII
355
XIII
358
XIV
360
XV
361
XVI
371
XIX
373
XXI
374
XXIII
375
XXV
377
XXVI
379
XXVII
381
XXVIII
382
XXIX
388
XXX
390
XXXI
391
XXXIV
392
XXXVI
393
XXXVIII
394
XL
395
XLII
396
XLIII
397
XLIV
398
XLVI
399
XLVII
401
XLVIII
404
XLIX
410
L
411
LI
412
LII
414
LIII
415
LIV
416
LV
418
LXIX
428
LXXII
429
LXXV
430
LXXVI
431
LXXVIII
432
LXXIX
433
LXXX
436
LXXXI
437
LXXXII
439
LXXXIII
441
LXXXIV
442
LXXXV
443
LXXXVI
444
LXXXIX
445
XC
446
XCI
448
XCIII
449
XCIV
485
XCV
509
XCVI
537
XCVII
566
XCVIII
585
XCIX
591
C
594
CI
597
CII
609
CIII
610
CIV
612
CVI
616
CVII
617
CVIII
619
CIX
620
CXI
621
CXIII
622
CXV
623

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 424 - I cannot say that ever in my life I suffered so much anxiety as I did in this affair...
Page 425 - As to the summons you send me to retire, I do not think myself obliged to obey it. Whatever may be your instructions, I am here by virtue of the orders of my general; and I entreat you, sir, not to doubt for one moment but that I am determined to conform myself to them with all the exactness and resolution which can be expected from the best officer.
Page 382 - Tied to our convoy, we could not lose sight of it without exposing it and our wounded to fall a prey to the savages, who pressed upon us, on every side, and to move it was impracticable, having lost many horses, and most of the drivers, stupefied by fear, hid themselves in the bushes, or were incapable of hearing or obeying orders. The savages growing every moment...
Page 424 - ... part of my company, was detaining me. This he promised not to do, but to forward my journey as much as he could. He protested he did not keep them, but was ignorant of the cause of their stay; though I soon found it out.
Page 52 - Washington was often heard to say during his lifetime, that the most beautiful spectacle he had ever beheld was the display of the British troops on this eventful morning.
Page 146 - ... wretched state of slavery than ever before existed in any state or country. Not content with violating their constitutional and chartered privileges...
Page 53 - ... retain their senses, and they behaved with a bravery and resolution worthy of a better fate. They adopted the Indian mode, and fought each man for himself behind a tree. This was prohibited by the general, who endeavored to form his men into platoons and columns, as if they had been maneuvering on the plains of Flanders.
Page 59 - I observed they had a great many bloody scalps, grenadiers' caps, British canteens, bayonets, &c. with them. They brought the news that Braddock was defeated. After that, another company came in, which appeared to be about one hundred, and chiefly Indians, and it seemed to me that almost every one of this company was carrying scalps; after this came another company with a number of waggon horses, and also a great many scalps.
Page 326 - At the end of these walls they set up split timber, so that they had timber all round, excepting a door at each end. At the top, in place of a chimney, they left an open place, and for bedding they laid down the aforesaid kind of bark, on which they spread bear-skins.
Page 52 - The general advanced speedily to the relief of these detachments ; but before he could reach the spot which they occupied, they gave way and fell back upon the artillery and the other columns of the army, causing extreme confusion, and striking the whole mass with such a panic, that no order could afterward be restored.

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