The Future of Cyber and Telecommunications Security at DHS: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Economic Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Cybersecurity of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives, One Hundred Ninth Congress, Second Session, September 13, 2006, Volume 4

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Page 32 - Security critical infrastructure protection responsibilities in (1) developing a comprehensive national plan for securing the key resources and critical infrastructure of the United States...
Page 15 - Internet, are revolutionizing the way our government, our nation, and much of the world communicate and conduct business. The benefits have been enormous. Vast amounts of information are now literally at our fingertips, facilitating research on virtually every topic imaginable; financial and other business transactions can be executed almost instantaneously, often on a 24-hour-a-day basis; and electronic mail.
Page 15 - Internet, continue to revolutionize the way much of the world communicate and conducts business, this widespread interconnectivity also poses significant risks to the government's and our nation's computer systems and, more importantly, to the critical operations and infrastructures they support. For example, telecommunications, power distribution, water supply, public health services, national defense (including the military's warfighting capability), law enforcement, government services, and emergency...
Page 26 - NIPC's ability to develop strategic analytical capabilities: • First, there was no generally accepted methodology for analyzing strategic cyber-based threats. For example, there was no standard terminology, no standard set of factors to consider, and no established thresholds for determining the sophistication of attack techniques. According to officials in the intelligence and national security community, developing such a methodology would require an intense interagency effort and dedication...
Page 14 - ... responsibilities noted in federal law and policy. We also reported that DHS faced a number of challenges that have impeded its ability to fulfill its cyber responsibilities. These challenges included achieving organizational stability, gaining organizational authority, overcoming hiring and contracting issues, increasing awareness of...
Page 16 - NIPP — but none has been completely addressed. Moreover, in 2006, we reported that DHS had begun a variety of initiatives to fulfill its responsibility to develop an integrated public/private plan for Internet recovery, but that these efforts were not complete or comprehensive.
Page 14 - ... .United States Government Accountability Office Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee: I am pleased to be here today to discuss...
Page 22 - ... coordinating crisis management for cyberspace security; 5. Improve national incident management; 6. Coordinate processes for voluntary participation in the development of national public-private continuity and contingency plans; 7. Exercise cybersecurity continuity plans for federal systems; and 8. Improve and enhance public-private information sharing involving cyber attacks, threats, and vulnerabilities. Priority II; A National Cyberspace Security Threat and Vulnerability Reduction Program...
Page 18 - As greater amounts of money are transferred through computer systems, as more sensitive economic and commercial information is exchanged electronically, and as the nation's defense and intelligence communities increasingly rely on commercially available information technology, the likelihood increases that information attacks will threaten vital national interests.