The Garden of Paradise

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Macmillan, 1915 - Drama (American) - 244 pages
 

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Page 221 - ... appeal. As a book the story seems to have lost none of its brilliance; in fact the sharpness of its character delineation, the intensity and reality of its plot and the lyrical beauty of some of its passages are, if possible more apparent on the printed page than in the theatre. There is little doubt but that the tremendous success which the drama made when footlighted is to be duplicated upon its appearance in this form. Poems BY HARRIET MONROE. Cloth, i2mo.
Page 221 - The Nigger, which proved to be one of the sensations of the New Theatre's short career, is now followed by Romance, a play more admirable, perhaps, in its construction, and of universal appeal. As a book the story seems to have lost none of its brilliance; in fact the sharpness of its character delineation, the intensity and reality of its plot and the lyrical beauty of some of its passages are, if possible more apparent on the printed page than in the theatre.
Page 180 - A voice in the wind that blows From the land beyond the sea Has sung to every rose The song it sings to me — To the white rose on my breast, To the butterflies and bees, To the little birds that nest Among the apple trees...
Page 110 - She is quite naked and has the legs and feet of a woman. Her long hair covers her like a mantle.] THE KING [Turning at her cry and seeing her.] White bird, is it you? [She reels and stretches out her hands to him.] Not you — ? [He rushes forward just in time to catch her as she falls, and, holding her high...
Page 103 - The wind that was so cold grew soft and warm and filled with the fragrance of an enchanted spring. Those naked trees were misty with strange blossoms. At every step new flowers sprang up beneath my feet.
Page 111 - ... you — ? [He rushes forward just in time to catch her as she falls, and, holding her high in his arms as he would a child, looks eagerly into her moonlit face. Then he shakes his head.] No — I was mad — and yet — and yet — [She sighs and opens her eyes and smiles up at him.] SWANHILD Lord!
Page 109 - Why, there is our palace — and the blue trees — my little garden and my statue — [Like a child.] Oh, I want to go home! I want to go home — THE WITCH Think of the home that waits for you beyond the stars!
Page 105 - Well enough, my lord! Unless it be a sickness of the mind to sit alone here in my chair and wish for all the things that cannot be. LORD OTHO What things, sire?
Page 224 - Sylvia .............. i . 25 net John Masefield's The Tragedy of Pompey ......... i. 25 net Philip, the King...
Page 113 - ... all. [Her voice shaking.] I am alone. [He bends over and gently kisses her forehead.] THE KING Poor shivering child! SWANHILD [Gasping.] I cannot see! There is something hot and wet in both my eyes — oh, lord, am I blind? THE KING [Smiling.] Blind? You are weeping — that is all.

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