The Gases of the Atmosphere, the History of Their Discovery

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1915 - Air - 306 pages
 

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Page 220 - Newlands pointed out in a brief letter to the Chemical News that if the elements be arranged in the order of their atomic weights...
Page 70 - For my own part, I will frankly acknowledge that at the commencement of the experiments recited in this section I was so far from having formed any hypothesis that led to the discoveries I made in pursuing them that they would have appeared very improbable to me had I been told of them...
Page 106 - ... much better than in common air, but I had not then given it any name. At this all the company, and Mr. and Mrs. Lavoisier as much as any, expressed great surprise. I told them I had gotten it from precipitate per se, and also from red lead. Speaking French very imperfectly, and being little acquainted with the terms of chemistry, I said plombe rouge, which was not understood till Mr. Macquer said I must mean minium. M. Scheele's discovery was certainly independent of mine, though, I believe,...
Page 142 - As far as the experiments hitherto published extend, we scarcely know more of the phlogisticated part of our atmosphere than that it is not diminished by lime-water, caustic alkalies, or nitrous air; that it is unfit to support fire or maintain life in animals ; and that its specific gravity is not much less than that of common air...
Page 138 - Another thing which Mr. Lavoisier endeavours to prove is that dephlogisticated air is the acidifying principle. From what has been explained, it appears that this is no more than saying that acids lose their acidity by uniting to phlogiston, which, with regard to the nitrous, vitriolic, phosphoric, and arsenical acids, is certainly true.
Page 30 - And since we are assured that the all-wise Creator has observed the most exact proportions, of number, weight and measure, in the make of all things; the most likely way therefore, to get any insight into the nature of those parts of the creation, which come within our observation, must in all reason be to number, weigh and measure.
Page 134 - From what has been said there seems the utmost reason to think, that dephlogisticated air is only water deprived of its phlogiston, and that inflammable air, as was before said, is either phlogisticated water, or else pure phlogiston ; but in all probability the former.
Page 129 - From the fourth experiment it appears, that 423 measures of inflammable air are nearly sufficient to completely phlogisticate 1000 of common air; and that the bulk of the air remaining after the explosion is then very little more than four-fifths of the common air employed; so that as common air cannot be reduced to a much less bulk than that by any method of phlogistication, we may safely conclude, that when they are mixed in this proportion, and exploded, almost all the inflammable air, and about...
Page 130 - By this means upwards of 135 grains of water were condensed in the cylinder, which had no taste nor smell, and which left no sensible sediment when evaporated to dryness ; neither did it yield any pungent smell during the evaporation ; in short, it seemed pure water.
Page 144 - Having by these means condensed as much as I could of the phlogisticated air, I let up some solution of liver of sulphur to absorb the dephlogisticated air ; after which only a small bubble of air remained unabsorbed, which certainly was not more than...

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