The gasoline automobile

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Contents

The torque arm
15
Strut rods
16
Wheels
18
Tires
19
Rims
20
The speedometer drive
21
Control systems
23
CHAPTER II
25
The fourstroke cycle
26
The order of events in fourstroke engines
27
The mechanism of fourstroke engines
28
Valve timing and setting
29
Valves
30
Valve arrangements
33
The Knight engine
34
Twostroke engines
35
The flywheel
38
Ignition
39
Cylinder cooling
40
Horse power of engines
41
PowerPlant Groups and Transmission Systems Art Page 39 Single and multicylinder engines
43
Power plant and transmission arrangements
44
Modern automobile power plants
50
Constructional features of fourand sixcylinder engines
56
Eight and twelvecylinder power plants
60
Clutches
64
Change gear sets
66
Planetary gearing
67
Universal joints and drive shaft
69
Final drive
70
Types of live rear axles
71
CHAPTER IV
75
Principles of vaporization
76
Heating value of fuels
79
Schebler model L carburetor
82
Schebler model R
84
The Holley model H carburetor
86
Holley model G
87
Stewart model 25
89
Kingston model L
90
Marvel carburetor
91
Stromberg model H
94
Rayfield model G
95
Carter model C
97
General rules for carburetor adjustment
98
Carburetor control methods
99
The pressure feed system
100
Intake manifolds
102
CHAPTER V
103
Cylinder oils
104
Splash system of engine lubrication
106
Full forced feed system
111
Mixing the oil with the gasoline
113
Directions for lubrication
114
Cylinder cooling H7 87 Water cooling systems
117
Air cooling
122
Cooling solutions for winter use
123
CHAPTER VI
127
Dry batteries
128
The Westinghouse ignition system
144
The Delco system of ignition
147
The RemyStudebaker ignition system
149
Spark advance and retard
151
CHAPTER VII
153
Mechanical generation of current
155
Low and high tension magnetos
156
Remy model P magneto
157
The Connecticut magneto
160
Eisemann high tension dual ignition
161
Eisemann automatic spark control
163
Akt Page 119 The Dixie magneto
166
The Bosch high tension magneto
167
The Bosch dual system
170
Bosch twoindependent system
173
The Ford magneto and ignition system
174
Magneto speeds
175
Timing the magneto
176
Battery vs magneto ignition
177
CHAPTER VIII
179
Mechanical starters
180
Electric starters
181
Battery charging
185
Wiring systems
187
The Delco system
190
Gray and Davis starting and lighting systems
193
Wagner starting and lighting system
197
The Westinghouse singleunit system
199
Westinghouse twounit system
200
The U S L electric starting and lighting system
204
Jesco singleunit electric starter and lighter
205
Care of starting and lighting apparatus
207
Starting motor troubles
208
Generator troubles
209
Donts on starting equipment
210
CHAPTER IX
213
Power plant troubles
214
Mechanical troubles in engine
216
Carburetion troubles
221
Ignition troubles
223
Lubricating and cooling troubles
226
Starting and lighting troubles
228
Chassis troubles
229
CHAPTER X
231
How to drive
232
Use of the brakes
233
Speeding
234
Driving in city traffic
235
Skidding
236
Knowing the cnr
237
The spring overhauling
238
Washing the car
240
Tire troubles
243
Figuring speeds
247
Interstate regulations
248
Canadian regulations
249
Touring helpsroute books
250
Index
255
Copyright

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Page 236 - Most skids can be corrected by the manipulation of the steering and brakes. An expert driver can keep his car straight under almost any conditions, but it is impossible to explain just how he does it. Usually the rear end skids first, and in the right hand direction, this being caused by the crown of the road. Under such conditions, the skidding action will be aggravated if the brakes are applied, and the car may be ditched or continue to skid until it hits the curb. The correct action in an emergency...
Page 198 - ... explained as follows: When the engine is started, the generator is driven by the engine, and it, therefore, increases and decreases in speed with the engine. When the engine is speeded up the generator follows with corresponding increase in speed and the voltage of the generator rises as the speed increases. As soon as the generator voltage gets to a point above the voltage of the battery, which is approximately six volts, the...
Page 79 - British thermal unit, or a Btu, being the quantity of heat energy required to raise the temperature of 1 lb. of water 1 on the Fahrenheit scale. The following table gives the heating values of the common fuels: Gasoline 18,000 to 19,500 Btu per pound.
Page 97 - U (see cut), slighty leaves contact with the Cam M. Then turn to the RIGHT about three complete turns. Open throttle not more than one-quarter.
Page 170 - The current will pass through this gap in case a cable is taken off while the magneto is in operation or if the electrodes on the spark plugs are too far apart. The...
Page 141 - Lever 2, The coil, which consists of a simple primary and secondary winding, with condenser — all imbedded in a special insulating compound. The coil has no vibrators or other moving parts. 3, The ignition switch. The operation of the unisparker is shown in Figs.
Page ii - Electrical World The Engineering andMining Journal Engineering Record Engineering News Railway Age Gazette...
Page 162 - Control of Spark. Principle. As the spark occurs only when the primary circuit is broken by the opening of the platinum contacts, the timing of the spark can, therefore, be controlled, by having these platinum contacts open sooner or later. This latter is accomplished by the angular movement of the timing lever. This movement gives a timing range of about 35 degrees. The spark is fully retarded when the timing lever is pushed as far as possible in the direction of rotation of the armature and is...
Page 82 - Figs. 101 and 102, is of the lift-needle type and is so designed that the amount of fuel entering the motor is controlled by means of a raised needle working automatically with the throttle. The flow of gasoline can be adjusted for closed, intermediate, or open throttle positions, each adjustment being independent and not affecting either of the others.
Page 41 - Formula.—The indicated horse power of a single-cylinder, four-stroke engine is equal to the mean effective pressure, P, acting throughout the working stroke, times the area of the piston, A, in square inches, times one-quarter the piston speed, S, divided by 33,000, thus: _PAS P.

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