The gay Lord Quex: a comedy in four acts

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R.H. Russell, 1900 - 186 pages
 

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Page 34 - No, no — you. Excuse me. You go on. QUEX. [Sitting on the edge of the table, looking down upon FRAYNE.] When I proposed to Miss Eden I was certain — even while I was stammering it out — I was certain that my infernal evil character • FRAYNE. Ah, yes. I've always been a dooced deal more artful than you, Harry, over my little amours. [Chuckling.] Ha, ha! devilish cunning! QUEX. And I was right. Her first words were, "Think of your life; how can you ask this of me?
Page 101 - MRS. EDEN. Ah, yes. DUCHESS. [Taking off her bracelets.} My jewel-case, Sophy. [SoPHY puts the note to her lips, slips it into the bodice of her dress, and re-enters the bedroom.'} MRS. EDEN. [To the DUCHESS.] By-the-by, what did Valma see in your hand, Duchess, after dinner? Why wouldn't you tell us? DUCHESS. I was too vexed at the moment. [With downcast eyes.~\ He professed to discover that a number of men are in love with me. MRS. EDEN. •.. Yes, but what made you angry? DUCHESS. Why, that. MRS....
Page 130 - I told her what your promises are worth. Yes, I was right! And now I can prove it! [He rises; she hastily places herself on the other side of the chair.'] QUEX. Look here! [Leaning against the table, the chair being between him and SOPHY.] What will you take to hold your tongue? SOPHY. Nothing. QUEX. Oh, but wait. This isn'ta matter of a handful of sovereigns. I'll give you a couple of thousand pounds to keep quiet about this. SOPHY. No, thank you, my lord. QUEX. Four thousand. SOPHY. [Shaking her...
Page 190 - I'm really not responsible for the sayings and doings of a parcel of stupid girls. If they didn't see Miss Eden go out they were asleep, and if they weren't asleep they're blind ; and as I've explained till I'm hoarse, I'm very busy this morning, and I should be extremely obliged to you two gentlemen if you'd kindly go away and call again a little later. QUEX. Chick. FRAYNE. Eh?
Page 187 - Eden feels equal to [Looking about him again.] Where is Miss Eden? SOPHY. Where? QUEX. She is here — with you. SOPHY. N — no. QUEX. No? SOPHY. [With a gulp.] I haven't seen anything of her. QUEX. [In an altered tone.] Really? SOPHY. No. QUEX. [Calmly.] Strange. [He walks away and joins FRAYNE. SOPHY stealthily closes and fastens the window.] QUEX. [In a low voice, .to FRAYNE.] Chick FRAYNE. Eh? QUEX. Miss Eden is here. Why is the Fullgarney telling me this falsehood? * FRAYNE. You will remember...
Page 157 - Poubelle, Carte d'Or." FRAYNE. [Shaking his head.] I can't take champagne. QUEX. Can't you! FRAYNE. I mean I oughtn't to. QUEX. Oh. [Referring to his watch again.] I've given you a pretty minute account of last night's tragedy, Chick. "I'll do what I can for you" — those were the Fullgarney's words. Good lord, they came at me like a bolt from the blue! Does she intend to act up to them, eh? — that's the question. Surely she'll act up to them, Chick? FRAYNE. Have you met the ladies this morning?...
Page 100 - Everything if subdued and faded in tone. There are no pillows upon the chairs, nor on the settee, nor any other signs of ease and comfort. Keys are in the locks of both the doors. [The DUCHESS and MRS. EDEN are seated — the DUCHESS in the arm-chair, MRS. EDEN upon the settee — smoking cigarettes. MRS. EDEN is wearing a smart dressing-jacket; the DUCHESS is still fully dressed. SOPHY, who has assumed an apron, is engaged in bringing hair-brushes and some toiletbottles from the bedroom and in arranging...
Page 96 - Sophy, you must not! you sha'n't! SOPHY. Why, isn't it for the best? If I was mistaken over what I heard just now, I sha'n't see or hear anything wicked to-night; and that will satisfy both of us ! LADY OWBRIDGE. [Calling.] Muriel [MURIEL joins the group; SOPHY slips away and disappears.] LADY OWBRIDGE. [To the DUCHESS.] Shall we go in?
Page 101 - Oh, thanks. [Closing the door.] I beg your pardon, your Grace — it's for me. [She returns to the dressing-table, reading the note.] MRS. EDEN. [Jestingly.] Ah, Sophy! you must encourage no more sweethearts now, remember. SOPHY. This is from him, Mrs. Eden — from Mr. Valma, saying good-night. He's gone to bed. MRS. EDEN. Good gracious! how do you know? SOPHY. Mrs. Gregory, the house-keeper, has allowed him to sleep here to-night, so that we may go back together in the morning. MRS. EDEN. Ah, yes....
Page 126 - After a pause the door is opened and SOPHY appears. The frills of her night-dress peep out from under the Mandarin's robe, and she is wearing a pair of scarlet cloth slippers; altogether she presents an odd, fantastic figure. She pauses in the doorway hesitatingly, then steadies herself and, with a defiant air, stalks into the bedroom. Directly she has moved away, QUEX softly closes the door, locks it, and pockets the key. Meanwhile SOPHY, looking about the bedroom for the DUCHESS, discovers the...

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