The Gentleman Pensioner: A Romance of the Year 1569

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D. Appleton & Company, 1900 - English fiction - 351 pages
 

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Page 358 - For brilliant conversations, epigrammatic bits of philosophy, keenness of wit, and full insight into human nature, ' Concerning Isabel Carnaby ' is a remarkable success." — Boston Transcript. " An excellent novel, clever and witty enough to be very amusing, and serious enough to provide much food for thought."— London Daily Telegraph.
Page 355 - The Terror' is a story that deserves to be widely read, for, while it is of thrilling interest, holding the reader's attention closely, there is about it a literary quality that makes it worthy of something more than a careless perusal.
Page 357 - The Cruise of the Cachalot" and " Idylls of the Sea" presents in this new work the continuous story of the actual experiences of his first four years at sea. In graphic and picturesque phrases he has sketched the events of voyages to the West Indies, to Bombay and the Coromandel coast, to Melbourne and Rangoon. Nothing could be of more absorbing interest than this wonderfully vivid account of foks'l humanity, and the adventures and strange sights and experiences attendant upon deep-sea voyages. It...
Page 357 - It is immense — there is no other word. I've never read anything that equals it in its deep-sea wonder and mystery, nor do I think that any book before has so completely covered the whole business of whale-fishing, and, at the same time, given such real and new sea pictures. I congratulate you most heartily. It's a new world you've opened the door to.
Page 82 - Good bread and good drink, a good fire in the hall, Brawn, pudding, and souse, and good mustard withal. Beef, mutton, and pork, shred pies of the best, Pig, veal, goose, and capon, and turkey well dressed, Cheese, apples, and nuts; jolly carols to hear, As then in the country is counted good cheer.
Page ii - France," and it is safe to say that no reader will find in its pages any reason for flagging interest or will relinquish the book until the last page has been reached. The Key of the Holy House. A Romance of Old Antwerp. " A romance of Antwerp in the days of the Spanish oppression. Mr. Lee handles it in vigorous fashion.
Page 196 - The thought of thee. And when once more upon my bed, Full wearily, In sweet repose I lay my head, — I dream of thee. In short, one only wish I have, To live for thee ; Or gladly if one pang 'twould save, I'd die for thee.
Page 357 - Sea.' We feel ourselves tossed with him at the mercy of the weltering elements," etc. — Philadelphia Record. " Amplifies and intensifies the picture of the sea which Mr. Bullen had already produced. . . . Calm, shipwreck, the surface and depths of the sea, the monsters of the deep, superstitions and tales of the sailors — all find a place in this strange and exciting book.
Page 355 - If Felix Gras had never done any other work than this novel, it would at once give him a place in the front rank of the writers of to-day. . . . 'The Terror' is a story that deserves to be widely read, for, while it is of thrilling interest, holding the reader's attention closely, there is about it a literary quality that makes it worthy of something more than a careless perusal." — Brooklyn Eagle. The Reds of the Midi.
Page 357 - Written with racy freedom of literary expression and luxuriant abundance of incident, so that ' The Cruise of the Cachalot ' becomes a story of fascinating vividness which thrills the reader and amuses him. The volume is no less enthralling than 'Two Years before the Mast,' and higher praise can not be accorded to a story of the sea.

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