The Geology of New Jersey: A Summary to Accompany the Geologic Map (1910-1912) on the Scale of 1:250,000, Or Approximately 4 Miles to 1 Inch

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Dispatch printing Company, 1915 - Geology - 146 pages
 

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Page 71 - Plain, where its maximum thickness is 200 feet, but it thins out southwestward and disappears midway across the State. It is the Red Sand of Cook and earlier writers, but does not include certain sands in the southern portion of the State that were erroneously correlated by Cook with the Red Sand of Monmouth County. With the overlying Tinton bed, it is the uppermost of the beds correlated with the Monmouth formation of Maryland. (See "Underground Waters,
Page 138 - Jersey,'' by J. Volney Lewis. Annual Report of the State Geologist for 1908, pp. 53-124 "The Fire-resisting Qualities of Some New Jersey Building Stones," by WE McCourt. Annual Report of the State Geologist for 1906, pp. 17-76. "Properties of Trap Rock for Road Construction,
Page 34 - Jersey becomes only a fringe of islands and the peninsula of Cape Cod. Further northward the subaerial portion disappears altogether through the submergence of the entire Coastal Plain. The moderate elevation of the Coastal Plain, which in few places reaches 400 feet and is for the most part less than half that amount, has prevented the streams from cutting valleys of any considerable depth. Throughout the greater portion of the plain, therefore, the relief is inconsiderable, the streams flowing...
Page 73 - green" and "ash" marls of Cook's Upper Marl bed and is the youngest of the Cretaceous formations exposed in New Jersey. It probably rests conformably upon the Vincentown and at most exposures is succeeded unconformably...
Page 69 - The Englishtown is a conspicuous bed of white or yellow quartz sand, slightly micaceous and sparingly glauconitic. Locally it has been cemented in part by iron oxide into massive stone. In places it contains thin laminae of fine brittle clay. So far as known it contains no fossils. It decreases in thickness from 100 feet near Atlantic Highlands to less than 20 feet in the southern portion of the State. It represents the lower part of the Hazlett sand of Clark and forms a part of Cook's Clay-Marl...
Page 57 - New Scotland Beds (Dnc). — The New Scotland beds that overlie the Coeymans limestone in the Nearpass section consist of about 20 feet of very hard cherty limestone followed by a series of calcareous shales having an estimated thickness of 140 feet. Nowhere in the State is there exposed a continuous section of these beds, as is the case with several of the lower formations. The fauna is a prolific one and is especially characterized by the abundant representation of the genus Spirifer. Its differences...
Page 32 - N'ew Jersey and southward it is bounded on the east by the Coastal Plain. Its surface is that of a dissected plateau or plain which slopes gently • eastward or southeastward from the base of the Appalachian Mountains and is broken here and there by knobs or ridges that rise several hundred feet above its surface. In the southern Appalachian region, where it lies well inland, the Piedmont Plateau stands at a considerable altitude and constitutes a true plateau, but toward the northeast it becomes...
Page 130 - Other and highej formations, however, particularly the Merchantville and Woodbury, are more important producers along the west side of the State. The clays of these latter formations are utilized chiefly for brick and fireproofing along the south shore of Raritan Bay in Monmouth County, in southern Middlesex and Mercer counties, and in Western Burlington and Camden counties. Local beds of clay in the Englishtown formation...
Page 76 - Well borings at Atlantic City, Wildwood, and other points along the coast have demonstrated the presence there of a great thickness of Miocene strata apparently not represented in outcrop.
Page 26 - ... a total area of 8,224 square miles. GEOGRAPHIC PROVINCES. The Atlantic slope of the United States is included in two geographic and geologic provinces: (1) the Coastal Plain, which borders the Atlantic from the Gulf of Mexico to the Hudson and which is represented northward to Massachusetts Bay by several islands and the peninsula of Cape Cod...

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