The Heart of Lincoln: The Soul of the Man as Revealed in Story and Anecdote

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G.W. Jacobs, 1915 - Presidents - 101 pages
 

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Page 80 - And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind and the gracious favor of Almighty God.
Page 59 - No one not in my position can appreciate the sadness I feel at this parting. To this people I owe all that I am. Here I have lived more than a quarter of a century; here my children were born, and here one of them lies buried. I know not how soon I shall see you again.
Page 27 - I sincerely hope Father may yet recover his health ; but at all events tell him to remember to call upon and confide in our great, and good, and merciful Maker, who will not turn away from him in any extremity. He notes the fall of a sparrow, and numbers the hairs of our heads; and He will not forget the dying man who puts his trust in Him.
Page 60 - A duty devolves upon me which is, perhaps, greater than that which has devolved upon any other man since the days of Washington. He never would have succeeded except for the aid of Divine Providence, upon which he at all times relied. I feel that I cannot succeed without the same Divine aid which sustained him, and...
Page 60 - WASHINGTON. He never would have succeeded except for the aid of Divine Providence, upon which he at all times relied. I feel that I cannot succeed without the same Divine aid which sustained him, and on the same Almighty Being I place my reliance for support, and I hope you, my friends, will all pray that I may receive that Divine assistance, without which I cannot succeed, but with which, success is certain. Again I bid you all an affectionate farewell.
Page 38 - I had ever heard. I took a great fancy to one of the girls ; and when they were gone I thought of her a great deal, and one day when I was sitting out in the sun by the house I wrote out a story in my mind. I thought I took my father's horse and followed the wagon, and finally I found it, and they...
Page 79 - If it were not for my firm belief in an over-ruling Providence," responded Mr. Lincoln, " it would be difficult for me, in the midst of such complications of affairs, to keep my reason on its seat. But I am confident that the Almighty has his plans, and will work them out ; and, whether we sec it or not, they will be the wisest and best for us.
Page 24 - Pulling off shoes and socks I waded across the stream and triumphantly returned with the shivering animal under my arm. His frantic leaps of joy and other evidences of a dog's gratitude amply repaid me for all the exposure I had undergone.
Page 46 - I have just heard of your deep affliction, and the arrest of your son for murder. " I can hardly believe that he can be capable of the crime alleged against him. " It does not seem possible. I am anxious that he should be given a fair trial at any rate; and gratitude for your long-continued kindness to me in adverse circumstances prompts me to offer my humble services gratuitously in his behalf.
Page 15 - I had a son, John, who was raised with Abe. Both were good boys ; but I must say, both now being dead, that Abe was the best boy I ever saw, or expect to see.

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