The history of Italy...

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J.Towers, 1753 - Italy
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Page 3 - Vallies ; and being under no Foreign Influence, but governed by their own Princes, Italy not only abounded with Inhabitants and Riches, but grew renowned for the Grandeur and Magnificence of her Sovereigns, for the Splendour of many noble and beautiful Cities ; for the Seat and Majesty of Religion, and for a Number of great Men of distinguished Abilities in the Administration of public Affairs, and of excellent...
Page xi - ... were in great danger of being lost, he was appointed to the government of those cities, and proved himself equal to the charge. His merit in this government recommended him, in 1521, to that of Parma, whence he drove away the French, and confirmed the Parmesans in their obedience ; and this at a time when the holy see was vacant by the death of Leo, and the people he commanded full of fears, disheartened, and unarmed. He retained the same post under Adrian VI. to whom he discovered the dangerous...
Page xix - ... if an account of your conduct is not to be transmitted to posterity for the instruction of your descendants? Who are they that have informed mankind of the heroic actions of your great ancestors, but historians ? It is necessary then to honour them, that they may be encouraged to convey the knowledge of your illustrious deeds to futurity. Thus, gentle...
Page xii - ... good houses and stately buildings ; a happiness, of which they were so sensible, that it rendered the name of Guicciardini dear to them, and they were overjoyed, when, after a farther promotion of Francis, they understood he was to be succeeded in his government by his brother. This happened June 6, 1526, when the pope, by a brief, declared him lieutenantgeneral of all his troops in the ecclesiastical state, with authority over his forces in other parts also, that were under the command of any...
Page xviii - you, however, to consider, that in one hour I can ' create a hundred nobles, and a like number of officers ' in the army, but I cannot produce such a historian ' in the space of twenty years. What benefit is there ' in your solicitude to execute your respective func...
Page xi - ... he drove away the French, and confirmed the Parmesans in their obedience ; and this at a time when the holy see was vacant by the death of Leo, and the people he commanded full of fears, disheartened, and unarmed. He retained the same post under Adrian VI. to whom he discovered the dangerous designs of Alberto Pio da Carpi, and got him removed from the government of Reggio and Rubiera* Clement VII. on his exaltation to the pontificate, confirmed him in that government. This pope was of the house...
Page 3 - ... Ambition. Before I proceed to give my Reader an Account of the Troubles in Italy, together with the Causes from whence so many Evils were derived, it will not be improper to observe, that our Calamities affected us with so much the greater Terror and Sensibility, as the Minds of Men were perfectly at Ease, and the Country at that Time in a State of profound Peace and Tranquillity. It is certain that, for above a thousand Years back, at which Period the Roman Empire, weaken'd by a Change of her...
Page 8 - ... contracted, in the Name of Ferdinando, King of Naples, Giov. Galeazzo, Duke of Milan, and the Republic of Florence, for the mutual Defence of each other's Dominions, was with Ease corroborated and confirmed. This League, of some Years standing, as I observed, but interrupted by various Accidents, was renewed for Twenty-five Years, in 1480, and acceded to by all the inferior Powers of Italy. The chief Design of the contracting Parties was to keep down the Power of the Venetians ; who were without...
Page 4 - ... Medici : A Citizen of such distinguished Merit in the State of Florence, that the whole Affairs of that Republic were conducted as he thought proper to advise or direct. And it was indeed to the Happiness of her Situation, the Ingenuity of the People, and the flourishing State of the public Credit, and her Opulency, that this Commonwealth chiefly owed her Power and Influence ; for the Extent of its Dominion was not great. Lorenzo, by Marriage, had made a strict Alliance with Pope Innocent the...
Page 8 - ... being satisfy'd that he would find it dangerous to act without, and difficult to procure an Alliance, he thought himself secure from any Attempt that could be made against him from that Quarter. There was then the same Inclination for Peace in Ferdinando, Lodovico, and Lorenzo ; partly from the same, and partly from different Motives ; So that a Confederacy many Years before contracted, in the Name of Ferdinando, King of Naples, Giov. Galeazzo, Duke of Milan, and the Republic of Florence, for...

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