The history of Pittsburgh: with a brief notice of its facilities of communication, and other advantages for commercial and manufacturing purposes, Volume 3

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J. H. Mellor, 1851 - History - 312 pages
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Page 21 - I spent some time in viewing the rivers, and the land in the Fork, which I think extremely well situated for a fort, as it has the absolute command of both rivers.
Page 125 - To extend Mason and Dixon's Line due West five degrees of "Longitude, to be computed from the river Delaware, for the "southern boundary of Pennsylvania, and that a meridian "drawn from the western extremity thereof, to the northern "limit of the said State, be the western boundary of Penn"sylvania forever.
Page 22 - As I had taken a good deal of notice yesterday of the situation at the Fork, my curiosity led me to examine this more particularly, and I think it greatly inferior, either for defence or advantages ; especially the latter.
Page 71 - I am sure we are undone both at home and abroad: at home by our increasing debt and expenses ; abroad by our illluck and incapacity. We are no longer a nation.
Page 22 - Allegany bearing northeast, and Monongahela southeast. The former of these two is a very rapid and swift running water, the other deep and still, without any perceptible fall. About two miles from this, on the southeast side of the river, at the place where the Ohio Company intended to erect a fort, lives Shingiss, King of the Delawares.
Page 186 - Pittsburgh is inhabited almost entirely by Scots and Irish, who live in paltry log houses, and are as dirty as if in the north of Ireland or even Scotland.
Page 30 - On the 3d of July early in the morning an alarm was received from a sentinel, who had been wounded by the enemy ; and at nine o'clock intelligence came, that the whole body of the enemy, amounting, as was reported, to nine hundred men, was only four miles off. At eleven o'clock they approached the fort, and began to fire, at the distance of six hundred yards, but without effect. Colonel Washington had drawn up his men on the open and level ground outside of the trenches, waiting for the attack, which...
Page 153 - whilst the colonel was assuring me that our Indians had nothing to fear, an officer came with great speed from one quarter of the camp, and reported that a particular division of the militia "were preparing to break off for the purpose of destroying the Moravian settlements up the river, and he feared they could not be restrained from so doing.
Page 194 - The appearance of the ditch and mound, with the salient angles and bastions still re mains, so as to prevent that perfect level of the ground which otherwise would exist. It has been long overgrown with the finest verdure, and depastured on by cattle ; but since the town has been laid out it has been enclosed, and buildings are erected.
Page 136 - That should our country be invaded by a foreign enemy, or should troops be sent from Great Britain to enforce the late arbitrary acts of its Parliament, we will cheerfully submit to military discipline, and to the utmost of our power resist and oppose them, or either of them, and will coincide with -any plan that may be formed for the defence of America in general, or Pennsylvania in particular.

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