The History of Richborough Castle, Near Sandwich, Kent: Compiled from the Best Authorities, and Brought Down to the Latest Discoveries : with Historical Notices of the Ancient Town of Stonar

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Henry Jones, 1843 - Castles - 52 pages
 

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Page 16 - Richborougli hill; for in digging a few years ago to lay the foundation of Richborough sluice, the workmen, after penetrating through what was once the muddy bed of the river that runs close by in a more contracted channel than formerly, came to a regular sandy sea shore, that had been suddenly covered with silt...
Page 16 - ... Richborough sluice, the workmen, after penetrating through what was once the muddy bed of the river that runs close by in a more contracted channel than formerly, came to a regular sandy sea shore, that had been suddenly covered with silt, on which lay broken and entire shells, oysters, sea weeds, the purse of the thornback, a small shoe with a metal fibula in it, and some small human bones; all of them, except the last article, with the same appearance of freshness as such things have on the...
Page 48 - Ebbsfleet, into which the people of Sandwich come without leave, and against the peace and consent of the said abbot, dig the soil and carry it away in their boats by force to Sandwich...
Page 26 - ... amber and amethyst, and glass bugles, the ornaments of female dress. Perhaps some of the following articles may seem to denote the occupation, or perhaps only the caprice, of the persons in whose graves they were found : a wooden pail with brass hoops ; a large pan of mixed metal found upon a similar one inverted ; the iron head of an axe ; part of a beam and brass balances of a small pair of scales, with one leaden and seven brass weights, two of them being coins of Faustina, the mother and...
Page 25 - It was a shell of brickwork, two bricks thick, filled with earth, the two projecting sides tied together with a brace of the same material. Two sorts of brick were used in this building ; one was...
Page 22 - It is a composition of boulders and coarse mortar, and the whole upper service to the very verge is covered over with a coat of the same sort of mortar, six inches thick. In the middle of this platform is the base of a superstructure in the shape of a cross, rising somewhat above the ground, and from four to five feet above the platform ; it has been faced with square etones, some of which remain.
Page 22 - It is a composition of holders and coarse mortar; and the whole upper surface, to the very verge, is covered over with a coat of the same sort of mortar, six inches thick. In the middle of the platform is the base of a superstructure in the shape of a cross, rising somewhat above the ground, and from four to five feet above the platform. It has been faced with squared stones, some of which remain. The shaft of the cross, running north and south, is...
Page 21 - Within the area of the Castle, not precisely in the centre, but somewhat towards the north-east corner, under ground, is a solid rectangular platform of masonry, 144-5 feet long, 104 feet wide, and five feet thick. It is a composition of holders and coarse mortar; and the whole upper surface, to the very verge, is covered over with a coat of the same sort of mortar, six inches thick. In the middle of the platform is the base of a superstructure in the shape...
Page 15 - Rutupensis,and in all probability was covered with the sea at the time the Romans were in this country. A strong presumptive proof of this is, that no remains whatever of that people occur anywhere throughout this flat district ; whereas we meet with coins and other Roman matters the moment we ascend the rising borders of the marsh.
Page 22 - ... feet in length. A base of such solidity could scarcely have been intended for the support of a roof, or have formed a part of any compound building. " Mr. Boys, it appears, was not aware of the existence of the most remarkable part of this structure, which remains to be described. In 1822, a gentleman named M. Gleig, and others, made excavations, and discovered beneath the platform mentioned above an extensive subterranean building, down the side...

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