The History of Scotland, Volume 4

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Blackie, Fullarton, 1827 - Scotland
 

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Page 119 - ... endeavour the extirpation of popery, prelacy (that is, church government by archbishops, bishops, their chancellors and commissaries, deans, deans and chapters, archdeacons and all other ecclesiastical officers depending on that hierarchy), superstition, heresy, schism, profaneness and whatsoever shall be found to be contrary to sound doctrine and the power of godliness...
Page 426 - Thus saith the LORD, Execute ye judgment and righteousness, and deliver the spoiled out of the hand of the oppressor: and do no wrong, do no violence to the stranger, the fatherless, nor the widow, neither shed innocent blood in this place.
Page 119 - We shall also, according to our places and callings, in this common cause of religion, liberty and peace of the kingdoms, assist and defend all those that enter into this league and covenant in the maintaining and pursuing thereof, and shall not suffer ourselves, directly or indirectly, by whatsoever combination, persuasion or terror, to be divided and withdrawn from this blessed union and conjunction...
Page 123 - Scotland, in doctrine, worship, discipline, and government, against our common enemies; the reformation of religion in the kingdoms of England and Ireland, in doctrine, worship, discipline, and government, according to the Word of God, and the example of the best reformed churches...
Page 133 - And the better to effect the intended reformation, we desire there may be a general synod of the most grave, pious, learned and judicious divines of this island ; assisted with some from foreign parts, professing the same religion with us, who may consider of all things necessary for the peace and good government of the Church...
Page 461 - I am a miserable and wretched creature, I am in covenant with thee, through grace, and I may, I will come to thee for thy people, thou hast made me, though very unworthy, a mean instrument to do them some good, and thee service...
Page 246 - And the men of Israel answered the men of Judah, and said, We have ten parts in the king, and we have also more right in David than ye: why then did ye despise us, that our advice should not be first had in bringing back our king? And the words of the men of Judah were fiercer than the words of the men of Israel.
Page 168 - For what do the enemy say? Nay, what do many say that were friends at the beginning of the Parliament ? Even this, that the members of both houses have got great places and commands, and the sword into their hands ; and, what by interest in Parliament, what by power in the army, will perpetually continue themselves in grandeur, and not permit the war speedily to end, lest their own power should determine with it.
Page 340 - Stuart, for accomplishment of such his designs, and for the protecting of himself and his adherents in his and their wicked practices, to the same ends hath traitorously and maliciously levied war against the present Parliament, and the people therein represented...
Page 284 - Sir, your Majesty speaks as if you had some secret strength and power that I do not know of; and since your Majesty hath concealed it from me, I wish you had concealed it from these men too.

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