The History of Human Marriage, Volume 44; Volume 526

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1891 - Marriage - 644 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
8
III
25
IV
39
V
51
VI
82
VII
115
VIII
134
XIV
278
XV
290
XVI
320
XVII
356
XVIII
383
XIX
403
XX
417
XXI
431

IX
157
X
165
XI
213
XII
240
XIII
253
XXII
460
XXIII
505
XXIV
517
XXV
537

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Page 153 - It was their favourite opinion, that if Adam had preserved his obedience to the Creator, he would have lived for ever in a state of virgin purity, and that some harmless mode of vegetation might have peopled paradise with a race of innocent and immortal beings.
Page 249 - I have seen the female sitting quietly on a branch, and two males displaying their charms in front of her. One would shoot up like a rocket, then suddenly expanding the snow-white tail like an inverted parachute, slowly descend in front of her, turning round gradually to show off both back and front. The effect was heightened by the wings being invisible from...
Page 152 - Now concerning the things whereof ye wrote : It is good for a man not to touch a woman. 2 But, because of fornications, let each man have his own wife, and let each woman have her own husband.
Page 540 - Westermarck, who has very fully and ably discussed the whole question,2 "there is an innate aversion to sexual intercourse between persons living very closely together from early youth, and, as such persons are in most cases related, this...
Page 406 - And they did eat and drink, he and the men that were with him, and tarried all night ; and they rose up in the morning, and he said, Send me away unto my master.
Page 40 - ... their common defence. It is no argument against savage man being a social animal, that the tribes inhabiting adjacent districts are almost always at war with each other; for the social instincts never extend to all the individuals of the same species. Judging from the analogy of the majority of the Quadrumana, it is probable that the early apelike progenitors of man were likewise social; but this is not of much importance for us.
Page 448 - If there be four or five brothers, and one of them, being old enough, gets married, his wife claims all the other brothers as her husbands, and as they successively attain manhood, she consorts with them ;• or if the wife has one or more younger sisters, they in turn, on attaining a marriageable- age, become the wives of their sister's husband or husbands ; and thus in a family of several brothers there may be-, according to circumstances, only one wife for them all, or many ; but, one or more,...
Page 491 - On hearing that a man in England could marry but one wife, several ladies exclaimed that they would not like to live in such a country : they could not imagine how English ladies could relish our custom ; for in their way of thinking, every man of respectability should have a number of wives as a proof of his wealth, faimilar ideas prevail all down the Zambesi.
Page 350 - Thus an instinct would be developed which would be powerful enough, as a rule, to prevent injurious unions. Of course it would display itself simply as an aversion on the part of individuals to union with others with whom they lived ; but these, as a matter of fact, would be blood-relations, so that the result would be the survival of the fittest.
Page 255 - Beauty is no quality in things themselves : It exists merely in the mind which contemplates them ; and each mind perceives a different beauty.

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