The history of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 3

Front Cover
W. Pickering, London, and Talboys and Wheeler, Oxford, 1827 - Rome
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
3
3 stars
4
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jigarpatel - www.librarything.com

Volume I It is a testament to the breadth of Gibbon's passion that his Decline and Fall, widely regarded as a literary monument, on reading appears merely to expatiate on some salient thoughts. The ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - msaucier818 - LibraryThing

That was a beast of a book. I had always wanted to read this book and the other volumes because I think it is the type of book that educated people should read. I read it in chunks throughout the ... Read full review

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 98 - O'er bog or steep, through strait, rough, dense, or rare, With head, hands, wings, or feet, pursues his way, And swims, or sinks, or wades, or creeps, or flies.
Page 217 - While Julian struggled with the almost insuperable difficulties of his situation, the silent hours of the night were still devoted to study and contemplation. Whenever he closed his eyes in short and interrupted slumbers, his mind was agitated with painful anxiety...
Page 186 - When you return to these again, you feel, by the emptiness and deadness of them, that you converse with some dreaming pedant with his elbow on his desk ; not with an active, ambitious tyrant, with his hand on his sword, commanding a million of subjects.
Page 25 - Every year, nay every moon, we make new creeds to describe invisible mysteries. We repent of what we have done, we defend those who repent, we anathematise those whom we defended.
Page 447 - ... tone and language of an ambassador of Heaven, declared to his sovereign, that private contrition was not sufficient to atone for a public fault, or to appease the justice of the offended Deity. Theodosius humbly represented, that if he had contracted the guilt of homicide, David, the man after God's own heart, had been guilty, not only of murder, but of adultery. "You have imitated David in his crime, imitate then his repentance," was the reply of the undaunted Ambrose.
Page 291 - If in the neighbourhood of the commercial and literary town of Glasgow a race of cannibals has really existed, we may contemplate in the period of the Scottish history the opposite extremes of savage and civilised life.
Page 373 - By the care of his attendants, Valens was removed from the field of battle to a neighbouring cottage, where they attempted to dress his wound and to provide for his future safety. But this humble retreat was instantly surrounded by the enemy; they tried to force the door; they were provoked by a discharge of arrows from the roof; till at length, impatient of delay, they set fire to a pile of dry faggots, and consumed the cottage with the Roman emperor and his train.
Page 320 - In the second year of the reign of Valentinian and Valens, on the morning of the twenty-first day of July, the greatest part of the Roman world was shaken by a violent and destructive earthquake. The impression was communicated to the waters; the shores of the Mediterranean were left dry, by the sudden retreat of the sea...
Page 196 - The face of the country was interspersed with groves of innumerable palm-trees, and the diligent natives celebrated, either in verse or prose, the three hundred and sixty uses to which the trunk, the branches, the leaves, the juice, and the fruit were skilfully applied.
Page 347 - A fabulous origin was assigned, worthy of their form and manners ; that the witches of Scythia, who for their foul and deadly practices had been driven from society, had copulated in the desert with infernal spirits ; and that the Huns were the offspring of this execrable conjunction™.

Bibliographic information