The history of the state of Maine: from its first discovery, A. D. 1602, to the separation, A. D. 1820, inclusive

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Glazier, Masters & Smith, 1839 - History
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Page 434 - In our own native land, in defence of the freedom that is our birthright, and which we ever enjoyed till the late violation of it — for the protection of our property, acquired solely by the honest industry of our fore-fathers and ourselves, against violence actually offered, we have taken up arms. We shall lay them down when hostilities shall cease on the part of the aggressors, and all danger of their being renewed shall be removed, and not before.
Page 504 - St. Croix River to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St. Lawrence, from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean, to the northwesternmost head of Connecticut River...
Page 634 - ... the impressment of British seamen, when found therein, can be deemed any violation of a neutral flag. Neither can he admit, that the taking such seamen from on board such vessels, can be considered by any Neutral State as a hostile measure, or a justifiable cause of war.
Page 368 - Nipissim; from whence the said line, crossing the River St Lawrence, and the Lake Champlain, in 45. degrees of north latitude, passes along the high lands which divide the rivers that empty themselves into the said River St Lawrence from those which fall into the sea...
Page 504 - Scotia, viz., that angle which is formed by a line drawn due north, from the source of St. Croix River to the highlands, along the highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the River St.
Page 673 - Whereas, by an Act of the State of Massachusetts, passed on the nineteenth day of June, in the year one thousand eight hundred and nineteen, entitled "An Act relating to the separation of the District of Maine from Massachusetts, Proper, and forming the same into a separate and independent State...
Page 443 - ... insult the inhabitants of Canada. Should any American soldier be so base and infamous as to injure any Canadian or Indian in his person or property, I do most earnestly enjoin you to bring him to such severe and exemplary punishment as the enormity of the crime may require ; should it extend to death itself, it will not be disproportionate to its guilt at such a time, and in such a cause.
Page 634 - His royal highness can never admit that in the exercise of the undoubted and hitherto undisputed right of searching neutral merchant vessels in time of war, the impressment of British seamen, when found therein, can be deemed any violation of a neutral flag.
Page 663 - Shall the Legislature be requested to give its consent to the " separation of the District of Maine Jrom Massachusetts, and " the erection of said District into a separate State...
Page 504 - East, by a line to be drawn along the middle of the river St. Croix, from its mouth in the Bay of Funcly to its source, and from its source directly north to the aforesaid Highlands, which divide the rivers that fall into the Atlantic Ocean from those which fall into the river St. Lawrence...

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