The History of the Two Ulster Manors of Finagh, in the County of Tyrone, and Coole, Otherwise Manor Atkinson, in the County of Fermanagh, and of Their Owners

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Longmans, Green & Company, 1881 - Genealogy - 383 pages
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Page 275 - Ordered, that Mr. Speaker do issue his warrant to the clerk of the crown, to make out a new writ...
Page 44 - House has met before that day, or will meet on the day of the issue), issue his warrant to the clerk of the Crown to make out a new writ for electing another member in the room of the member whose seat has so become vacant.
Page 270 - His Majesty is persuaded that the unremitting industry with which our enemies persevere in their avowed design of effecting the separation of Ireland from this kingdom cannot fail to engage the particular attention of Parliament; and His Majesty recommends it to this House to consider of the most effectual means of counteracting and finally defeating this design...
Page 26 - Assigns make do and Execute or Cause to be made done and Executed all and every such further and other Lawful and Reasonable Act and Acts Thing and Things Device and Devices in the Law whatsoever for the further better and more perfect Granting...
Page 54 - Ballishannon, but staid behind in the camp) did minister an oath unto him, and gave him a very serious charge to inform us truly what was become of the roll. The poor old man, fetching a deep sigh, confessed that he knew where the roll was, but that it was dearer to him than his life ; and therefore he would never deliver it out of his hands, unless my Lord Chancellor would take the like oath, that the roll should be restored to him again ; my Lord Chancellor, smiling, gave him his word and his hand...
Page 268 - ... was seised of the tenements aforesaid, with the appurtenances, in his demesne, as of fee and right, in the time of peace, in the time of the said lord GEORGE the first late king of Great Britain, by taking the esplees thereof to the value, S(c.
Page 59 - And yet they think that their houses shall continue for ever, and that their dwelling-places shall endure from one generation to another ; and call the lands after their own names.
Page 270 - the unremitting industry with which our enemies persevere in their avowed design of endeavouring to effect a separation of this kingdom from Great Britain, must have engaged your particular attention, and His Majesty commands me to express his anxious hope that this consideration, joined to the sentiment of mutual affection and common interest, may dispose the Parliaments in both kingdoms to provide the most effectual means of maintaining and improving a connection essential to their common security,...
Page 53 - O'Bristan was sent for, who lived not far from the camp, but was so aged and decrepid as he was scarce able to repair...
Page 299 - Land some few English Families, but they have no Estates; for since the old Earl died, the Tenants (as they tell me) cannot have their Leases made good unto them, unless they will bring treble the Rent which they paid ; and yet they must but have half the land which they enjoyed in the late Earl's time.

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