The Household of a Tudor Nobleman

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Torch Press, 1918 - England - 269 pages
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Page 148 - I'll be your guest to-morrow night,' How should we stir ourselves, call and command All hands to work ! ' Let no man idle stand. ' Set me fine Spanish tables in the hall, See they be fitted all ; Let there be room to eat, And order taken that there want no meat. See every sconce and candlestick made bright, That without tapers they may give a light. ' Look to the presence : are the carpets spread, The...
Page 73 - Come on, sir; here's the place: — stand still. — How fearful And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows, and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 248 - Precepts or Directions for the Well Ordering and Carriage of a Man's Life.
Page 135 - Beware thou spend not above three or four parts of thy revenues, nor above a third part of that in thy house; for the other two parts will do no more than defray thy extraordinaries, which always surmount the ordinary by much...
Page 148 - Yet if His Majesty our sovereign lord Should of his own accord Friendly himself invite, And say "I'll be your guest to-morrow night," How should we stir ourselves, call and command All hands to work! "Let no man idle stand. "Set me fine Spanish tables in the hall, See they be fitted all; Let there be room to eat, And order taken that there want no meat. See every sconce and candlestick made bright, That without tapers they may give a light. "Look to the presence: are the carpets spread, The...
Page 190 - For this ointment might have been sold for above three hundred pence, and given to the poor. And they murmured against her. But Jesus said, Let her alone ; why trouble ye her? she hath wrought a good work on me. For ye have the poor always with you, and whensoever ye will ye can do them good : but me ye have not always.
Page 135 - And that gentleman who sells an acre of land sells an ounce of credit.; for gentility is nothing else but ancient riches.
Page 65 - ... reason for this severity, they answered that they did it in order that their children might learn better manners. But I, for my part, believe that they do it because they like to enjoy all their comforts themselves, and that they are better served by strangers than they would be by their own children. Besides which the English being great epicures, and very avaricious by nature, indulge in the most delicate fare themselves and give their household the coarsest bread, and beer, and cold meat baked...
Page 31 - In this respect Earl Henry was but following the custom of his father, who, in turn, doubtless inherited the practice as a tradition. Stow writing about the "life and death" of the said Edward, which were "deserving Commendation, and craving Memorie to be imitated, " notes the earl's generosity towards "gentlemen . . . who waited in his service...
Page 25 - So noble a man, so valiaunt lord and knyght, Fulfilled with honor, as all the world doth ken ; At his commaundement which had both day and nyght Knyghtes and Squyers, at euery season when He calde vpon them, as meniall houshold men ; . . . 1 JOHN SKELTON.

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