The Indispensable Enemy: Labor and the Anti-Chinese Movement in California

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University of California Press, 1971 - History - 293 pages
2 Reviews
The purpose of this study is to examine the Chinese confrontation, on the Pacific Coast, as it was experienced and rationalized by the white majority. For reasons which will be evident in what follows, the main body of the work (chapters 3 through 11) will focus on the Democratic party and the labor movement of California through the forty-year period after the Civil War. The two opening chapters turn back to explore aspects of the Jacksonian background which appear crucial to an understanding of what occurred in California. The final chapter looks beyond the turn of the century to trace certain results of the sequence of events in the West for the labor movement as a whole, and to suggest the influence of those events upon the crystallization of an American concept of national identity.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
IDEOLOGICAL BAGGAGE
19
MINES AND RAILROADS
46
REHABILITATION OF THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY
67
THE ROAD TO REUNION
92
THE WORKINGMENS PARTY
113
WORKINGMEN AND THE SYSTEM
138
THE SOCIALIST ACADEMY
157
DEADLOCK OF LEADERSHIP
179
THE FEDERATED TRADES
201
THE PROGRESSIVE ERA
229
A FORWARD GLANCE
258
BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE
285
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About the author (1971)

Alexander Saxton is Professor Emeritus of History, University of California, Los Angeles.

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